Don't Appear to Be Clenching Your Buttocks When Pulled Over For Not Coming to a Complete Stop at Stop Sign or Be Tortured by Doctors: America, This is Your War on Drugs

From the “folks, this is just wrong” department of our War on
Drugs, reported
by KOB-TV 4
in New Mexico. They are reporting on a lawsuit that
arose from an:

incident [that] began January 2, 2013 after David Eckert
finished shopping at the Wal-Mart in Deming.  According to a
federal lawsuit, Eckert didn’t make a complete stop at a stop sign
coming out of the parking lot and was immediately stopped by law
enforcement.      

Eckert’s attorney, Shannon Kennedy, said in an interview with
KOB that after law enforcement asked him to step out of the
vehicle, he appeared to be clenching his buttocks.  Law
enforcement thought that was probable cause to suspect that Eckert
was hiding narcotics in his anal cavity.  While officers
detained Eckert, they secured a search warrant from a judge that
allowed for an anal cavity search.  

The lawsuit claims that Deming Police tried taking Eckert to an
emergency room in Deming, but a doctor there refused to perform the
anal cavity search citing it was “unethical.”

But physicians at the Gila Regional Medical Center in Silver
City agreed to perform the procedure and a few hours later, Eckert
was admitted.

While there…

1. Eckert’s abdominal area was x-rayed; no narcotics were found.
 

2. Doctors then performed an exam of Eckert’s anus with their
fingers; no narcotics were found.

3. Doctors performed a second exam of Eckert’s anus with their
fingers; no narcotics were found.  

4. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema. 
Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and police
officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his stool. 
No narcotics were found.

5. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema a second
time.  Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and
police officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his
stool.  No narcotics were found.

6. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema a third
time.  Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and
police officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his
stool.  No narcotics were found.

7. Doctors then x-rayed Eckert again; no narcotics were found.
 

8. Doctors prepared Eckert for surgery, sedated him, and then
performed a colonoscopy where a scope with a camera was inserted
into Eckert’s anus, rectum, colon, and large intestines.  No
narcotics were found.  

Throughout this ordeal, Eckert protested and never gave doctors
at the Gila Regional Medical Center consent to perform any of these
medical procedures….

There are major concerns about the way the search warrant was
carried out.  Kennedy argues that the search warrant was
overly broad and lacked probable cause.  But beyond that, the
warrant was only valid in Luna County, where Deming is
located.  The Gila Regional Medical Center is in Grant
County.  That means all of the medical procedures were
performed illegally and the doctors who performed the procedures
did so with no legal basis and no consent from the patient.
 ….

The warrant also had expired in time when the “medical
procedures” were carried out. Eckert is suing the city of Deming
and Deming Police Officers Bobby Orosco, Robert Chavez
and Officer Hernandez, as well as three Hidalgo County Deputies and
two doctors from the Gila Regional Medical Center.

The petty legalities of time and place of the carrying out of
these hidieous tortures will, I hope, be sufficient for Eckert to
win his suit; but of course the entire thing is an abomination from
beginning to end. If only he could just sue for “police being petty
officious asshole morons, and doctors violating their professional
standards and all human decency by going along.”

I blogged yesterday on military doctors
also violating their oaths and decency
in the name of
orders.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/dont-appear-to-be-clenching-your-buttock
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Rand Paul’s Plagiarism, and the Weird Man’s Burden

I dunno, she probably has the longer reach. |||There are two scandals regarding a national
politician’s veracity this week. One is about a president
lying
about his signature, transformative legislative
achievement, while his administration
lies
and
prevaricates
some more in the face of being caught selling the
American public a bill of goods. The second
initially centered around
a senator
lifting movie-description passages from Wikipedia
in his
speeches. You could almost see the thought bubble around Rand
Paul’s head–how could they possibly be nitpicking me in
this of all weeks? But that is exactly the wrong response, both
externally and internally, as new revelations make even more
clear.

First came
word
Sunday that a whole
1,318-word section
of Paul’s book
Government Bullies
was lifted from a Heritage Foundation
study (the think tank just shrugged). The
latest
is that a September Washington Times
op-ed
the senator wrote on mandatory minimums, and also

testimony
he gave on the subject to the Senate Judiciary
Committee, was lifted from a recent piece by Dan
Stewart
in The Week.

Taken together, these sloppy, undergraduate-level infractions
suggest strongly that Sen. Paul is running a loose ship, one not
currently ready for the prime time of winning a national
election.

"GATTACA! GATTACA! GATTACA!" Oh wait, wrong movie. |||“There are technicalities to
this, but nothing I said was not given attribution to where it came
from,” Paul
said prematurely last week
, in response to the first wave of
Wikipedia discoveries. “[People are] making a mountain out of a
molehill….It’s a disagreement about how you footnote things.” By
“people” he especially meant MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, who (along
with Buzzfeed) has been stoking this controversy: “She’s
been spreading hate on me for about three years now,” he
complained. On ABC’s
This Week
on Sunday, Paul even wished out loud he could
challenge his critics to a duel.

There are two fundamental problems to this kind of defensive
response. The first is managerial–what kind of message do you send
staff by waving off such juvenile, 100% avoidable unforced errors
as “technicalities”? That’s like putting up a sign in the office
saying “substandard work welcome here.” In a world of free plagiarism-detection
services
, the time to begin
scrubbing old speeches for possible problems
 was last
week, when the senator was busy lashing out at his critics.

The second problem, which cuts straight to the heart of the
difference between Rand Paul and his dad, is that he’s actually
trying to win the presidency. If your goal is to genuinely
compete in a general election with your once-marginalized ideas,
instead of building a revolutionary movement at the margins, then
you don’t need to be as clean as the competition–you need to be
cleaner. Why? Call it The Weird Man’s Burden.

They'll beat you and they'll treat you like a carnival clown. |||Rand Paul, like his father, has
a lot of “weird” ideas, at least in the cramped context of how
“responsible” two-party politics and governance has played out over
the past several decades. He thinks the drug war is a failure and
has introduced ways to peel it back. He wants to balance the budget
in five years, and slash several federal departments. He believes
in the Fourth Amendment. He is anti-interventionist to the point
that when I asked him repeatedly earlier this summer to name
American military conflicts during his lifetime he would have
retroactively supported, the only he came up with was deposing the
Taliban after 9/11. You and I may think those positions are within
the bands of normality, but libertarians are still
less than one-quarter of the population

The Weird Man (and Woman, bien sur), very crudely
speaking, has two broad avenues available for changing the system:
from within, and from without. Since us weirdos are often, well,
weird, there’s a natural attraction toward hopeless,
beautiful, philosophically pure fires on the sidelines. (This isn’t
libertarian-specific—it’s true of any group whose
issue or issues have been consistently disregarded over time.)
Henry David Thoreau wasn’t trying to fix slavery and imperialistic
war from within Washington, he simply refused to pay his taxes and
headed off into the woods to write. It is emotionally satisfying to
give the finger to The Man, and out there on the margins it is an
affirmation, not an occasion for self-reflection, when the
mainstream and its apologists attack you, whatever the
reason. 

Aaaaaaaaand SCENE! |||The other avenue for Weird Man change-making goes
not into the woods, but into the streets, television screens, and
halls of power. It is an inherently compromising approach–even
Martin Luther King was dismissed in his lifetime as a sellout. As
King and many of the most effective Inside-Gamers have learned,
however, it can be an incredibly effective tactic to present your
claims with more dignity, decorum, and “self-purification” than
the mainstream you aim to change. Think about it–gay rights at
first was the stuff of revolutionaries and outrage-generating
paraders, but the gay marriage debate really took off with
a bullet when those two sweet old ladies got married in San
Francisco. The movement to legalize marijuana by necessity began
with the gray-ponytail crowd, and will end with square-jawed
businessmen in suits
. This is not to state a preference for one
of the two main avenues of change–Rand wouldn’t be a national
politician without Ron’s rEVOLution–but rather to identify the
characteristics of the path that Rand has very obviously
chosen. 

So what does that mean in this instance? If he wants to run for
president, he needs to be better, not worse, and not
merely as good, as the competition when it comes to the most
seemingly trivial matters of comportment. Journalists, particularly
(though not only) from
those outlets
sensitive to the allure that libertarian ideas
have on some progressive voters, will be gunning for every
possible gaffe, glitch, error of judgment, and stated deviance. He
should consider it an honor to be challenged, instead of a
challenge to get huffy about.

Get used to it, Rook. |||People who choose the Inside Game know, or at
least should know, that the deck is stacked against them,
and that they will be judged more harshly. Those were always the
rules. On the upside, being the first real truth-teller inside an
empire of lies carries with it enormous galvanizing potential.
Whining about being picked on in this context is like complaining
about getting fouled when you drive to the hoop against Bill
Laimbeer and Rick Mahorn. The answer is to dunk the damned
basketball, not bitch to the refs. And for god’s sake, make sure
your shoes are tied.

It’s actually helpful for Rand Paul’s presidential ambitions to
be having these mini-kerfuffles in November 2013. It’s doubtful
that they will have any impact on the 2016 race, and he could
clearly use the practice. 

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/rand-pauls-plagiarism-and-the-weird-mans
via IFTTT

Rand Paul’s Plagiarism, and the Weird Man's Burden

I dunno, she probably has the longer reach. |||There are two scandals regarding a national
politician’s veracity this week. One is about a president
lying
about his signature, transformative legislative
achievement, while his administration
lies
and
prevaricates
some more in the face of being caught selling the
American public a bill of goods. The second
initially centered around
a senator
lifting movie-description passages from Wikipedia
in his
speeches. You could almost see the thought bubble around Rand
Paul’s head–how could they possibly be nitpicking me in
this of all weeks? But that is exactly the wrong response, both
externally and internally, as new revelations make even more
clear.

First came
word
Sunday that a whole
1,318-word section
of Paul’s book
Government Bullies
was lifted from a Heritage Foundation
study (the think tank just shrugged). The
latest
is that a September Washington Times
op-ed
the senator wrote on mandatory minimums, and also

testimony
he gave on the subject to the Senate Judiciary
Committee, was lifted from a recent piece by Dan
Stewart
in The Week.

Taken together, these sloppy, undergraduate-level infractions
suggest strongly that Sen. Paul is running a loose ship, one not
currently ready for the prime time of winning a national
election.

"GATTACA! GATTACA! GATTACA!" Oh wait, wrong movie. |||“There are technicalities to
this, but nothing I said was not given attribution to where it came
from,” Paul
said prematurely last week
, in response to the first wave of
Wikipedia discoveries. “[People are] making a mountain out of a
molehill….It’s a disagreement about how you footnote things.” By
“people” he especially meant MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, who (along
with Buzzfeed) has been stoking this controversy: “She’s
been spreading hate on me for about three years now,” he
complained. On ABC’s
This Week
on Sunday, Paul even wished out loud he could
challenge his critics to a duel.

There are two fundamental problems to this kind of defensive
response. The first is managerial–what kind of message do you send
staff by waving off such juvenile, 100% avoidable unforced errors
as “technicalities”? That’s like putting up a sign in the office
saying “substandard work welcome here.” In a world of free plagiarism-detection
services
, the time to begin
scrubbing old speeches for possible problems
 was last
week, when the senator was busy lashing out at his critics.

The second problem, which cuts straight to the heart of the
difference between Rand Paul and his dad, is that he’s actually
trying to win the presidency. If your goal is to genuinely
compete in a general election with your once-marginalized ideas,
instead of building a revolutionary movement at the margins, then
you don’t need to be as clean as the competition–you need to be
cleaner. Why? Call it The Weird Man’s Burden.

They'll beat you and they'll treat you like a carnival clown. |||Rand Paul, like his father, has
a lot of “weird” ideas, at least in the cramped context of how
“responsible” two-party politics and governance has played out over
the past several decades. He thinks the drug war is a failure and
has introduced ways to peel it back. He wants to balance the budget
in five years, and slash several federal departments. He believes
in the Fourth Amendment. He is anti-interventionist to the point
that when I asked him repeatedly earlier this summer to name
American military conflicts during his lifetime he would have
retroactively supported, the only he came up with was deposing the
Taliban after 9/11. You and I may think those positions are within
the bands of normality, but libertarians are still
less than one-quarter of the population

The Weird Man (and Woman, bien sur), very crudely
speaking, has two broad avenues available for changing the system:
from within, and from without. Since us weirdos are often, well,
weird, there’s a natural attraction toward hopeless,
beautiful, philosophically pure fires on the sidelines. (This isn’t
libertarian-specific—it’s true of any group whose
issue or issues have been consistently disregarded over time.)
Henry David Thoreau wasn’t trying to fix slavery and imperialistic
war from within Washington, he simply refused to pay his taxes and
headed off into the woods to write. It is emotionally satisfying to
give the finger to The Man, and out there on the margins it is an
affirmation, not an occasion for self-reflection, when the
mainstream and its apologists attack you, whatever the
reason. 

Aaaaaaaaand SCENE! |||The other avenue for Weird Man change-making goes
not into the woods, but into the streets, television screens, and
halls of power. It is an inherently compromising approach–even
Martin Luther King was dismissed in his lifetime as a sellout. As
King and many of the most effective Inside-Gamers have learned,
however, it can be an incredibly effective tactic to present your
claims with more dignity, decorum, and “self-purification” than
the mainstream you aim to change. Think about it–gay rights at
first was the stuff of revolutionaries and outrage-generating
paraders, but the gay marriage debate really took off with
a bullet when those two sweet old ladies got married in San
Francisco. The movement to legalize marijuana by necessity began
with the gray-ponytail crowd, and will end with square-jawed
businessmen in suits
. This is not to state a preference for one
of the two main avenues of change–Rand wouldn’t be a national
politician without Ron’s rEVOLution–but rather to identify the
characteristics of the path that Rand has very obviously
chosen. 

So what does that mean in this instance? If he wants to run for
president, he needs to be better, not worse, and not
merely as good, as the competition when it comes to the most
seemingly trivial matters of comportment. Journalists, particularly
(though not only) from
those outlets
sensitive to the allure that libertarian ideas
have on some progressive voters, will be gunning for every
possible gaffe, glitch, error of judgment, and stated deviance. He
should consider it an honor to be challenged, instead of a
challenge to get huffy about.

Get used to it, Rook. |||People who choose the Inside Game know, or at
least should know, that the deck is stacked against them,
and that they will be judged more harshly. Those were always the
rules. On the upside, being the first real truth-teller inside an
empire of lies carries with it enormous galvanizing potential.
Whining about being picked on in this context is like complaining
about getting fouled when you drive to the hoop against Bill
Laimbeer and Rick Mahorn. The answer is to dunk the damned
basketball, not bitch to the refs. And for god’s sake, make sure
your shoes are tied.

It’s actually helpful for Rand Paul’s presidential ambitions to
be having these mini-kerfuffles in November 2013. It’s doubtful
that they will have any impact on the 2016 race, and he could
clearly use the practice. 

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/rand-pauls-plagiarism-and-the-weird-mans
via IFTTT

President Obama Covers Up an Old Lie With a New One

If you’re a fan of comic books
or other types of serial fiction, you’re probably familiar with the
concept of the “retcon”—a made-up word that stands for “retroactive
continuity
.”

For the not-so-geeky, the basic idea is that the authors of some
long-running storyline change previously established facts within
the narrative. Often the idea is to facilitate new storylines,
or, less generously, to help struggling serial writers work
themselves out of some difficult plot corner they’ve written
themselves into.

Fans sometimes complain about the way the practice can upend
complex stories that have been developing for years. But in
general, they’re expected to just go along and accept that the old
story is gone, and the new story is what really happened.
 

I wonder if President Obama is a comic book fan. Because with
the updated version of his oft-repeated promise that individuals
who like their health plans can keep them, he’s essentially
retconned himself.

Here’s how Obama
described his promise
yesterday: “Now, if you had one of these
plans before the Affordable Care Act came into law and you really
liked that plan, what we said was you can keep it if it hasn’t
changed since the law passed.”

This isn’t just an update. It’s a backwards revision. Obama is
not just changing his claim going forward—he’s attempting to alter
what he said in the past as well. 

Let’s look through some back issues for a moment. Here’s what
Obama used to say about the circumstances under which you can keep
your health plan, via New York Magazine

Got that? If you’re happy with your plan, nobody’s changing it.
If you like your plan, you can keep it. You will keep it. Nobody’s
changing it. 

There are no exceptions here, no qualifications or caveats. It’s
a promise, as Obama has said, period.
No matter what

This is what Obama actually said. But now he’s saying it’s not.
He’s covering for his old lie with a new one—an insistence that he
never misled in the first place. And he’s hoping that everyone just
goes along. The most ardent fanboys might buy it. But most people,
I suspect, will see it for the artless and desperate revisionism
that it is. 

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/president-obama-covers-up-an-old-lie-wit
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Wealth Effect Disappointed As Non-Manufacturing ISM Beats Expectations

In the worst possible news for the wealth effect and stocks (recall JPM’s warning yesterday), moments ago the Non-manufacturing ISM printed at 55.4, beating expectations of a 54.0 print and above September 54.4 number proving once again that all the fire and brimstone about the government shutdown having an adverse impact on the US economy was nothing but hollow propaganda. As for the actual print, this is horrible news for those betting on ongoing US economic collapse as it means the Fed may, just may, reduce its $85 billion in monthly flow some time in the future. Sure enough, stocks kneejerked lower, as did gold and the EURUSD, while 10 Year yields spiked to 2.664%. And while the bulk of internal numbers also rose, those who live and breathe the destruction of the US economy to send the S&P to recorder highs, can find solace in a New Orders print of 56.8, down from 59.6, which was the lowest number since July.

Charting the data:

Breakdown:

From the report:

The report was issued today by Anthony Nieves, CPSM, C.P.M., CFPM, chair of the Institute for Supply Management™ Non-Manufacturing Business Survey Committee. “The NMI® registered 55.4 percent in October, 1 percentage point higher than September’s reading of 54.4 percent. This indicates continued growth at a faster rate in the non-manufacturing sector. The Non-Manufacturing Business Activity Index increased to 59.7 percent, which is 4.6 percentage points higher than the 55.1 percent reported in September, reflecting growth for the 51st consecutive month. The New Orders Index decreased by 2.8 percentage points to 56.8 percent, and the Employment Index increased 3.5 percentage points to 56.2 percent, indicating growth in employment for the 15th consecutive month. The Prices Index decreased 1.1 percentage points to 56.1 percent, indicating prices increased at a slower rate in October when compared to September. According to the NMI®, 10 non-manufacturing industries reported growth in October. Respondents’ comments are mixed with the majority reflecting an uptick in business. A number of respondents indicate that they are negatively impacted by the government shutdown.”

From the respondents.

  • “Sales continue to increase slightly over the same period last year.” (Public Administration)
  • “We experienced an increase in the level of interest in our services, job awards and professional services placements.” (Professional, Scientific & Technical Services)
  • “Signs of improvement and stability are encouraging; however, the political environment and the cost of ObamaCare are causing a retrenching as costs escalate and margins shrink.” (Retail Trade)
  • “Economy continues to be a challenge with consumer fear as a result of the government partial shutdown.” (Accommodation & Food Services)
  • “Economic conditions continue to improve slowly in spite of government policy. Housing continues to lead.” (Management of Companies & Support Services)
  • “Business activities are stable compared to previous month.” (Finance & Insurance)

But perhaps most amusing about today’s report is that in addition to shrimpt, the only commodity reported in short supply, continues to be Helium, now in its fifth month of shortage. Considering Washington, one can see why.


    



via Zero Hedge http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/zerohedge/feed/~3/BLs1cEqKk64/story01.htm Tyler Durden

Will Virginia Libertarian Gubernatorial Candidate Sarvis Crack Open the Corrupt Democrat/Republican Duopoly?

Robert SarvisLibertarian gubernatorial
candidate Robert Sarvis’ campaign slogan: “Open Minded and Open for
Business” has to be one of the most copacetic I’ve ever
encountered. If Sarvis can clear the 10 percent electoral benchmark
that would give the Libertarian Party a line on the ballots of the
Old Dominion through 2021, offering Virginians a way to get beyond
the intellectually bankrupt so-called major parties. The
Danville Register and Bee
summed up
the situation well in its editorial endorsement of
Sarvis:

Both the Democrats and Republicans failed to come up with good
gubernatorial candidates this year. If we were to endorse either
McAuliffe or Cuccinelli, we would be playing their game. “If you
always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve
always got,” the saying goes.

Robert Sarvis offers a real alternative this year, a break from
the two-party paradigm that has not served us well.

As a Libertarian, Sarvis favors restraints on the size and scope
of government. We’re comfortable with that.

“I realized that the Republican Party, at least in Virginia, in
the current era, is not a good vehicle for liberty candidates,”
Sarvis told the Richmond Times-Dispatch in August. “Republicans are
very strident on personal issues. When they talk about liberty,
they don’t mean any personal issues, there is very little respect
for personal autonomy.

“And on economic issues, it’s almost like they don’t believe in
what they talk about. They talk about limited government, but they
are just as bad as the other party at cronyism, raising taxes and
growing government.”

If there is one knock on Sarvis’ record, it is this: He has
never held elected office. If he wins on Tuesday, he would have to
navigate a swamp of partisan politics in Richmond.

But as a conservative, he would be a political kindred spirit
with many of the Republicans in the General Assembly. We believe he
could be more than just a novelty candidate in 2013, but the kind
of governor who inspires confidence from Virginians and respect
from other members of the General Assembly.

What we won’t get from Sarvis is a big-government agenda. In a
year when so many other things have gone wrong, a young man with a
new way of looking at our old problems is just what the Old
Dominion needs. We’re not interested in what Robert Sarvis can do
for the Libertarian Party; we’re interested in what this young,
intelligent and highly-motivated family man can do to change the
two-party trap we’ve gotten ourselves into.

I’m off to the polls in a bit to cast my ballot for a candidate
who offers more than the usual lesser-of-two-evils electoral
choice.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/will-virginia-libertarian-gubernatorial
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Cities Consider Pot, Development, GMO Labeling, Minimum Wage in Local Elections Today

Former Reason man Mike Riggs writes at The
Atlantic
on some
interesting issues to watch for libertarians
in local elections
happening today–vote early and often, if that’s the sort of thing
you enjoy.

After a bunch of stuff on mayoral races, he gets down to the
ballot initiatives where such Reason-y issue as pot, GMO
foods, the hapless aftermath of huge civic spending projects,
public pensions, the minimum wage, and development are being
subject to electoral whim hither and yon across this land of
ours:

Marijuana: Question 1 in Portland, Maine,
would remove all legal penalties for possession of marijuana so
long as the possessor is over 21 and has less than 2.5 ounces of
pot. Even if Question 1 passes, Portland law
enforcement can
still arrest people under state law if they so choose
.
Proposition AA in Colorado asks voters to approve the official tax rates
and regulatory schemes
 for the state’s recreational
marijuana industry. 

Development: Propositions B and C in San
Francisco will determine whether
developers can build luxury condos
 along the water at 8
Washington Street. Proponents say developers will pay into San
Francisco’s affordable housing fund and develop open space;
opponents say the development will be worse than the Embarcadero
Freeway

GMO Labeling: Initiative 522 in Washington
state would require companies that use genetically modified
organisms in their products to say that on their labels. Most of
Washington’s newspapers oppose the measure, as do corporations like
Kraft and Monsanto. The American Association for the
Advancement of Science, the World Health Organization, and the
European Union all
agree that GMOs are safe
. The response of I-522
proponents boils
down to
: What’s the harm in a label? 

Minimum Wage: A question on today’s ballot
would allow New Jersey residents to raise the minimum wage from
$7.25 to $8.25 an hour, and enshrine annual cost of living
increases in the state constitution. While business owners have
said the measure’s passage might
force them to lay people off
, the measure had quite
a bit of support earlier this year

Pensions: The passage of issue 4 would
result in a massive overhaul for Cincinnati’s public
pensions. According
to Governing magazine
, Issue 4 “would affect
about 7,500 workers, retirees and their beneficiaries and would
close off the city’s defined benefits plan to new hires and enroll
them in a 401(k) style plan.”

The Astrodome: Years after it was
abandoned by the Astros, today Houstonians will
decide what
to do with Astrodome
. The ballot measure would raise property
taxes by
a half-cent per $100 of home value
; that money would then be
used to turn the Astrodome into a convention center.

Who can build what where on their property, who can smoke what
when, what mutually agreed deals you can make with your fellow
humans, how much you’ll be on the hook for deals government makes
with its workers, what to force other people to pay for for a
“convention center”–all these and more, decided by the whims of a
very few of the people around you. Look around you, America. Do you
trust them on this? Doesn’t matter!

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/cities-consider-pot-development-gmo-labl
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Intern at Reason This Coming Spring!

The deadline for Reason magazine’s
Spring internship, which begins in January, is next week (November
13). Applications have been coming in already, but given that I am
expecting some applications to be sent in at the last possible
moment, I thought it would be worth highlighting some
words of wisdom
from my former colleague Mike Riggs, who back
in March outlined five tips on how to land an internship. If you
don’t feel like reading Mike’s post in full (you really should),
here are the tips in brief:

  • Follow instructions
  • Write the hell out of your cover letter
  • Show some familiarity with the publication
  • Tell me what you can do for us, because we know what we can do
    for you
  • Be Patient

I know it sounds easy, but otherwise good applicants have
jeopardized their chances of securing an internship here in the
past by not following these simple tips. Those lucky enough to get
an internship here have the chance to write for Reason
magazine and Reason.com, conduct research, and proofread. 

The instructions for how to apply for the internship are
here.
 

Check out the work done by our current interns Jess
Remington
 and Zenon Evans.

Good luck wannabe Reason interns. I look forward to
hearing from you soon. 

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/intern-at-reason-this-coming-spring
via IFTTT

Rand Simberg Asks: How Safe Should a New Frontier Be?

The final frontier is the harshest, most
hazardous and most unforgiving one humanity has confronted. Rand
Simberg explains that he looks forward to commercial space flight
in this dangerous environment, because the government prioritizes
excessive safety over actual development and exploration. Just hope
that private space enterprise isn’t smothered before it
launches.

View this article.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/rand-simberg-asks-how-safe-should-a-new
via IFTTT

Record US Income Inequality In One Chart

It is well-known that US wealth inequality is now at record spreads, thanks to five (and counting) years of Fed-mediated wealth transfer from the poor and middle class to the superrich (while placating the lower social strata with distracting welfare trinkets and EBT). Perhaps nowhere is this more evident than in the following chart courtesy of just released data by the Social Security administration showing the net compensation breakdown by income bucket for America’s 153.6 million workers.

As an aside, in 2012 the average wage was $42,498.21, while the median one was far lower, ot $27,519.10.

But that is a broad average. Narrowing the data down, is what we have done in the chart below which shows that in 2012, the poorest 23.3 million working Americans, who earned between $0.01 and $4,999.99 at  an average net comp of $2,024.79, earned a total of $47.2 billion. And on the other end, we looked at the richest 2,915 Americans who earned $10 million or over in the past year, an average of $22 million per worker, and cumulatively, some $64.3 billion.

In brief: in the past year, the poorest 23.3 million Americans earned 36% less than the richest 2,915 Americans. Needless to say, this excludes wealth from capital and asset appreciation, usually a benefit reserved exclusively for the latter; it also excludes the amount of taxes paid by either of these two income extremes.

Source: Social Security


    



via Zero Hedge http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/zerohedge/feed/~3/mztRpt5SpyE/story01.htm Tyler Durden