Gene Healy on Getting Past the John F. Kennedy Mythology

John F. KennedyJohn F. Kennedy places near the top 10 in most
presidential ranking surveys of historians, and in a 2011 Gallup
poll, Americans ranked him ahead of George Washington in a list of
“America’s greatest presidents.” Kennedy’s murder was a national
tragedy, to be sure, but an honest assessment of his record shows
that our lawless and reckless 35th president was anything but a
national treasure. That may sound harsh, writes Gene Healy, but 50
years after his passing is not too soon to take a clear-eyed look
at JFK’s legacy.

View this article.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/gene-healy-on-getting-past-the-john-f-ke
via IFTTT

A Short History of the New World Order

Amid reports that the alleged LAX gunman Paul Ciancia left a
note that referred to the “NWO” — widely believed to be a
reference to the New World Order — Lizzie Crocker of The Daily
Beast
has written a short
piece
 about the history of the phrase. I make a few
appearances in her story:

I'm in love with this malicious intent/You've been taken but you don't know it yetIt might be easy to mistake the
NWO as a concept born out of Tea Party politics, since the movement
occasionally throws the term around, especially when talking about
the Obama administration. But Jesse Walker, author of The
United States of Paranoia
, says that the idea has been a
constant in modern American political life and its historical roots
run deep….

According to Walker, the [debate over the] League of Nations
introduced the term to the political and cultural lexicon after the
First World War to describe “evolving world institutions.” The New
World Order was also the titular subject of writer H.G. Wells’ 1940
treatise, published one year after the outbreak of World War II,
which advocated that nation states band together to prevent future
outbreaks of war (“I am not going to write peace propaganda here,”
Wells wrote.) The idea of a one-world government also appears, in a
thinly-veiled form, in Wells’ 1933 book The Open Conspiracy:
Blue Prints For a World Revolution
(whose subtitle he later
changed to, “What Are We To Do With Our Lives?”), which encouraged
a “mental sanitation process” to erase nationalistic ideals from
people’s consciousness so they can accept their new roles as “world
citizen[s].”

From there the article goes on to describe the John Birch
Society’s discovery of the phrase, as figures such as Nelson
Rockfeller and Richard Nixon deployed the term in various contexts
in the 1960s. And then we jump to the ’90s and President George
H.W. Bush, who used the words “new world order” while sketching a
vision of the post–Cold War world. Bush’s fondness for the phrase
helped unleash a new wave of New World Order fears, not just on the
populist right but in the counterculture.

One point I stressed in the interview is that it’s possible for
critics of the New World Order to use the term to describe broad
political trends or to use it to describe a
conspiracy allegedly driving those trends. It is not an innately
conspiracist concept, though it is frequently bound up with
conspiracy stories.

If you’re interested in reading Wells’ book The New World
Order
, it’s online here. The
Open Conspiracy
is here.
And it’s been a while since I last did a roundup of United
States of Paranoia
links, so:

• Arthur Goldwag, who has written a
couple
of
books
about conspiracy theories himself,
reviews the book
 on his blog.

• Seth Blake reviews
it
in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/a-short-history-of-the-new-world-order
via IFTTT

Fayette County arrest reports — Oct. 22-28

The following arrests were reported by local law enforcement agencies for the past week. All persons are considered innocent until proven guilty:

Tuesday, Oct. 22 – Monday, Oct. 28

Fayette County Sheriff’s Office

Juan B. Cruz-Cruz, born in 1982, of Lee Road, Opelika, Ala., for windshield and/or wiper violation, brake light/turn signal violation and driving without valid license.

Bobby W. Howell, Jr., born in 1986, of Nowell Drive, Fairburn, for probation/parole violation.

Dexter G. Lewis, born in 1972, of Jones Avenue, Albany, for bench warrant.

read more

via The Citizen http://www.thecitizen.com/articles/11-05-2013/fayette-county-arrest-reports-%E2%80%94-oct-22-28

Barry Sternlicht Warns "Everyone Is Holding Cash Because They Know When It Ends It's Gonna Get Ugly"

The Fed is playing a very dangerous game,” Starwood Capital’s Barry Sternlicht warns,”and they need to stop.” Sternlicht has quadrupled his firm’s net worth in this time and, to the incredulity of the CNBC anchors, warns, “this is bad, this is a heroine addiction.. and now they are printing more money than the deficit.” The outspoken CEO of the $29 billion fund, noted “all my friends who are money managers.. are much closer to the sell button than they ever were before,” adding that “everyone’s holding cash,” since if they start to get nervous “volatility will come back instantly.” Simply put, he concludes, “you know when this ends, it’s gonna get ugly.”

On Fed QE and investors’ heroin addiction:

they should knock this off. This is bad. This is a heroin addiction. The more you get on it, the worse it’s going to get; the more asset values inflate.”

 

 

Further to Sternlicht’s point that “you’re gonna hold cash”,

A new survey of family offices by Citi finds that the wealthy are cash heavy—meaning they may fall short of the investment returns they’re expecting.

 

Wealthy families have about 39 percent of their assets in cash, according to a recent poll of more than 50 large family office representatives from 20 countries conducted by Citi Private Bank.


    



via Zero Hedge http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/zerohedge/feed/~3/i68LmWliegM/story01.htm Tyler Durden

Barry Sternlicht Warns “Everyone Is Holding Cash Because They Know When It Ends It’s Gonna Get Ugly”

The Fed is playing a very dangerous game,” Starwood Capital’s Barry Sternlicht warns,”and they need to stop.” Sternlicht has quadrupled his firm’s net worth in this time and, to the incredulity of the CNBC anchors, warns, “this is bad, this is a heroine addiction.. and now they are printing more money than the deficit.” The outspoken CEO of the $29 billion fund, noted “all my friends who are money managers.. are much closer to the sell button than they ever were before,” adding that “everyone’s holding cash,” since if they start to get nervous “volatility will come back instantly.” Simply put, he concludes, “you know when this ends, it’s gonna get ugly.”

On Fed QE and investors’ heroin addiction:

they should knock this off. This is bad. This is a heroin addiction. The more you get on it, the worse it’s going to get; the more asset values inflate.”

 

 

Further to Sternlicht’s point that “you’re gonna hold cash”,

A new survey of family offices by Citi finds that the wealthy are cash heavy—meaning they may fall short of the investment returns they’re expecting.

 

Wealthy families have about 39 percent of their assets in cash, according to a recent poll of more than 50 large family office representatives from 20 countries conducted by Citi Private Bank.


    



via Zero Hedge http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/zerohedge/feed/~3/i68LmWliegM/story01.htm Tyler Durden

Metaphysical Monetary Musings From Deutsche Bank

Deutsche’s Jim Reid has been on quite a flight of fancy in the past few days. His latest comment, mixing the metaphysical and monetary, is merely the latest indication showing just how ubiquitous the Fed’s influential tentacles have spread.

From DB’s Jim Reid

We are not alone. After going through the FT this morning it’s clearly a bit quiet as the story that has most caught my attention is the one suggesting that new research has estimated that there are more than 20bn Earth-like planets in our Milky Way with temperatures that could sustain life. A remarkable number. Maybe as we speak 5bn of them are contemplating tapering, 10bn have already tapered and 5bn are simply having too much fun to care!

 

A few years ago DB research put out a piece with the title “The Fed is from Venus and the ECB from Mars” which now seems a little parochial given this revelation.

 

Nevertheless news from planet Fed and planet ECB remain the key drivers at the moment. If you want a rough guide to how important central banks have become to the world’s economies and markets this year, in the 28 DB articles our weekly EWR publication highlighted last month, one in every two of them included discussion of central bank policy. By comparison in October 2012’s 22 articles, only three discussed central bank policy (14%). So markets aren’t always this one dimensional.

And here, without any specific purpose, is a gratuitous photo of Carl Sagan.


    



via Zero Hedge http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/zerohedge/feed/~3/oiS-23Yhq64/story01.htm Tyler Durden

Don't Appear to Be Clenching Your Buttocks When Pulled Over For Not Coming to a Complete Stop at Stop Sign or Be Tortured by Doctors: America, This is Your War on Drugs

From the “folks, this is just wrong” department of our War on
Drugs, reported
by KOB-TV 4
in New Mexico. They are reporting on a lawsuit that
arose from an:

incident [that] began January 2, 2013 after David Eckert
finished shopping at the Wal-Mart in Deming.  According to a
federal lawsuit, Eckert didn’t make a complete stop at a stop sign
coming out of the parking lot and was immediately stopped by law
enforcement.      

Eckert’s attorney, Shannon Kennedy, said in an interview with
KOB that after law enforcement asked him to step out of the
vehicle, he appeared to be clenching his buttocks.  Law
enforcement thought that was probable cause to suspect that Eckert
was hiding narcotics in his anal cavity.  While officers
detained Eckert, they secured a search warrant from a judge that
allowed for an anal cavity search.  

The lawsuit claims that Deming Police tried taking Eckert to an
emergency room in Deming, but a doctor there refused to perform the
anal cavity search citing it was “unethical.”

But physicians at the Gila Regional Medical Center in Silver
City agreed to perform the procedure and a few hours later, Eckert
was admitted.

While there…

1. Eckert’s abdominal area was x-rayed; no narcotics were found.
 

2. Doctors then performed an exam of Eckert’s anus with their
fingers; no narcotics were found.

3. Doctors performed a second exam of Eckert’s anus with their
fingers; no narcotics were found.  

4. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema. 
Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and police
officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his stool. 
No narcotics were found.

5. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema a second
time.  Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and
police officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his
stool.  No narcotics were found.

6. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema a third
time.  Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and
police officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his
stool.  No narcotics were found.

7. Doctors then x-rayed Eckert again; no narcotics were found.
 

8. Doctors prepared Eckert for surgery, sedated him, and then
performed a colonoscopy where a scope with a camera was inserted
into Eckert’s anus, rectum, colon, and large intestines.  No
narcotics were found.  

Throughout this ordeal, Eckert protested and never gave doctors
at the Gila Regional Medical Center consent to perform any of these
medical procedures….

There are major concerns about the way the search warrant was
carried out.  Kennedy argues that the search warrant was
overly broad and lacked probable cause.  But beyond that, the
warrant was only valid in Luna County, where Deming is
located.  The Gila Regional Medical Center is in Grant
County.  That means all of the medical procedures were
performed illegally and the doctors who performed the procedures
did so with no legal basis and no consent from the patient.
 ….

The warrant also had expired in time when the “medical
procedures” were carried out. Eckert is suing the city of Deming
and Deming Police Officers Bobby Orosco, Robert Chavez
and Officer Hernandez, as well as three Hidalgo County Deputies and
two doctors from the Gila Regional Medical Center.

The petty legalities of time and place of the carrying out of
these hidieous tortures will, I hope, be sufficient for Eckert to
win his suit; but of course the entire thing is an abomination from
beginning to end. If only he could just sue for “police being petty
officious asshole morons, and doctors violating their professional
standards and all human decency by going along.”

I blogged yesterday on military doctors
also violating their oaths and decency
in the name of
orders.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/dont-appear-to-be-clenching-your-buttock
via IFTTT

Don’t Appear to Be Clenching Your Buttocks When Pulled Over For Not Coming to a Complete Stop at Stop Sign or Be Tortured by Doctors: America, This is Your War on Drugs

From the “folks, this is just wrong” department of our War on
Drugs, reported
by KOB-TV 4
in New Mexico. They are reporting on a lawsuit that
arose from an:

incident [that] began January 2, 2013 after David Eckert
finished shopping at the Wal-Mart in Deming.  According to a
federal lawsuit, Eckert didn’t make a complete stop at a stop sign
coming out of the parking lot and was immediately stopped by law
enforcement.      

Eckert’s attorney, Shannon Kennedy, said in an interview with
KOB that after law enforcement asked him to step out of the
vehicle, he appeared to be clenching his buttocks.  Law
enforcement thought that was probable cause to suspect that Eckert
was hiding narcotics in his anal cavity.  While officers
detained Eckert, they secured a search warrant from a judge that
allowed for an anal cavity search.  

The lawsuit claims that Deming Police tried taking Eckert to an
emergency room in Deming, but a doctor there refused to perform the
anal cavity search citing it was “unethical.”

But physicians at the Gila Regional Medical Center in Silver
City agreed to perform the procedure and a few hours later, Eckert
was admitted.

While there…

1. Eckert’s abdominal area was x-rayed; no narcotics were found.
 

2. Doctors then performed an exam of Eckert’s anus with their
fingers; no narcotics were found.

3. Doctors performed a second exam of Eckert’s anus with their
fingers; no narcotics were found.  

4. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema. 
Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and police
officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his stool. 
No narcotics were found.

5. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema a second
time.  Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and
police officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his
stool.  No narcotics were found.

6. Doctors penetrated Eckert’s anus to insert an enema a third
time.  Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and
police officers.  Eckert watched as doctors searched his
stool.  No narcotics were found.

7. Doctors then x-rayed Eckert again; no narcotics were found.
 

8. Doctors prepared Eckert for surgery, sedated him, and then
performed a colonoscopy where a scope with a camera was inserted
into Eckert’s anus, rectum, colon, and large intestines.  No
narcotics were found.  

Throughout this ordeal, Eckert protested and never gave doctors
at the Gila Regional Medical Center consent to perform any of these
medical procedures….

There are major concerns about the way the search warrant was
carried out.  Kennedy argues that the search warrant was
overly broad and lacked probable cause.  But beyond that, the
warrant was only valid in Luna County, where Deming is
located.  The Gila Regional Medical Center is in Grant
County.  That means all of the medical procedures were
performed illegally and the doctors who performed the procedures
did so with no legal basis and no consent from the patient.
 ….

The warrant also had expired in time when the “medical
procedures” were carried out. Eckert is suing the city of Deming
and Deming Police Officers Bobby Orosco, Robert Chavez
and Officer Hernandez, as well as three Hidalgo County Deputies and
two doctors from the Gila Regional Medical Center.

The petty legalities of time and place of the carrying out of
these hidieous tortures will, I hope, be sufficient for Eckert to
win his suit; but of course the entire thing is an abomination from
beginning to end. If only he could just sue for “police being petty
officious asshole morons, and doctors violating their professional
standards and all human decency by going along.”

I blogged yesterday on military doctors
also violating their oaths and decency
in the name of
orders.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/dont-appear-to-be-clenching-your-buttock
via IFTTT

Rand Paul’s Plagiarism, and the Weird Man's Burden

I dunno, she probably has the longer reach. |||There are two scandals regarding a national
politician’s veracity this week. One is about a president
lying
about his signature, transformative legislative
achievement, while his administration
lies
and
prevaricates
some more in the face of being caught selling the
American public a bill of goods. The second
initially centered around
a senator
lifting movie-description passages from Wikipedia
in his
speeches. You could almost see the thought bubble around Rand
Paul’s head–how could they possibly be nitpicking me in
this of all weeks? But that is exactly the wrong response, both
externally and internally, as new revelations make even more
clear.

First came
word
Sunday that a whole
1,318-word section
of Paul’s book
Government Bullies
was lifted from a Heritage Foundation
study (the think tank just shrugged). The
latest
is that a September Washington Times
op-ed
the senator wrote on mandatory minimums, and also

testimony
he gave on the subject to the Senate Judiciary
Committee, was lifted from a recent piece by Dan
Stewart
in The Week.

Taken together, these sloppy, undergraduate-level infractions
suggest strongly that Sen. Paul is running a loose ship, one not
currently ready for the prime time of winning a national
election.

"GATTACA! GATTACA! GATTACA!" Oh wait, wrong movie. |||“There are technicalities to
this, but nothing I said was not given attribution to where it came
from,” Paul
said prematurely last week
, in response to the first wave of
Wikipedia discoveries. “[People are] making a mountain out of a
molehill….It’s a disagreement about how you footnote things.” By
“people” he especially meant MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, who (along
with Buzzfeed) has been stoking this controversy: “She’s
been spreading hate on me for about three years now,” he
complained. On ABC’s
This Week
on Sunday, Paul even wished out loud he could
challenge his critics to a duel.

There are two fundamental problems to this kind of defensive
response. The first is managerial–what kind of message do you send
staff by waving off such juvenile, 100% avoidable unforced errors
as “technicalities”? That’s like putting up a sign in the office
saying “substandard work welcome here.” In a world of free plagiarism-detection
services
, the time to begin
scrubbing old speeches for possible problems
 was last
week, when the senator was busy lashing out at his critics.

The second problem, which cuts straight to the heart of the
difference between Rand Paul and his dad, is that he’s actually
trying to win the presidency. If your goal is to genuinely
compete in a general election with your once-marginalized ideas,
instead of building a revolutionary movement at the margins, then
you don’t need to be as clean as the competition–you need to be
cleaner. Why? Call it The Weird Man’s Burden.

They'll beat you and they'll treat you like a carnival clown. |||Rand Paul, like his father, has
a lot of “weird” ideas, at least in the cramped context of how
“responsible” two-party politics and governance has played out over
the past several decades. He thinks the drug war is a failure and
has introduced ways to peel it back. He wants to balance the budget
in five years, and slash several federal departments. He believes
in the Fourth Amendment. He is anti-interventionist to the point
that when I asked him repeatedly earlier this summer to name
American military conflicts during his lifetime he would have
retroactively supported, the only he came up with was deposing the
Taliban after 9/11. You and I may think those positions are within
the bands of normality, but libertarians are still
less than one-quarter of the population

The Weird Man (and Woman, bien sur), very crudely
speaking, has two broad avenues available for changing the system:
from within, and from without. Since us weirdos are often, well,
weird, there’s a natural attraction toward hopeless,
beautiful, philosophically pure fires on the sidelines. (This isn’t
libertarian-specific—it’s true of any group whose
issue or issues have been consistently disregarded over time.)
Henry David Thoreau wasn’t trying to fix slavery and imperialistic
war from within Washington, he simply refused to pay his taxes and
headed off into the woods to write. It is emotionally satisfying to
give the finger to The Man, and out there on the margins it is an
affirmation, not an occasion for self-reflection, when the
mainstream and its apologists attack you, whatever the
reason. 

Aaaaaaaaand SCENE! |||The other avenue for Weird Man change-making goes
not into the woods, but into the streets, television screens, and
halls of power. It is an inherently compromising approach–even
Martin Luther King was dismissed in his lifetime as a sellout. As
King and many of the most effective Inside-Gamers have learned,
however, it can be an incredibly effective tactic to present your
claims with more dignity, decorum, and “self-purification” than
the mainstream you aim to change. Think about it–gay rights at
first was the stuff of revolutionaries and outrage-generating
paraders, but the gay marriage debate really took off with
a bullet when those two sweet old ladies got married in San
Francisco. The movement to legalize marijuana by necessity began
with the gray-ponytail crowd, and will end with square-jawed
businessmen in suits
. This is not to state a preference for one
of the two main avenues of change–Rand wouldn’t be a national
politician without Ron’s rEVOLution–but rather to identify the
characteristics of the path that Rand has very obviously
chosen. 

So what does that mean in this instance? If he wants to run for
president, he needs to be better, not worse, and not
merely as good, as the competition when it comes to the most
seemingly trivial matters of comportment. Journalists, particularly
(though not only) from
those outlets
sensitive to the allure that libertarian ideas
have on some progressive voters, will be gunning for every
possible gaffe, glitch, error of judgment, and stated deviance. He
should consider it an honor to be challenged, instead of a
challenge to get huffy about.

Get used to it, Rook. |||People who choose the Inside Game know, or at
least should know, that the deck is stacked against them,
and that they will be judged more harshly. Those were always the
rules. On the upside, being the first real truth-teller inside an
empire of lies carries with it enormous galvanizing potential.
Whining about being picked on in this context is like complaining
about getting fouled when you drive to the hoop against Bill
Laimbeer and Rick Mahorn. The answer is to dunk the damned
basketball, not bitch to the refs. And for god’s sake, make sure
your shoes are tied.

It’s actually helpful for Rand Paul’s presidential ambitions to
be having these mini-kerfuffles in November 2013. It’s doubtful
that they will have any impact on the 2016 race, and he could
clearly use the practice. 

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/rand-pauls-plagiarism-and-the-weird-mans
via IFTTT

Rand Paul’s Plagiarism, and the Weird Man’s Burden

I dunno, she probably has the longer reach. |||There are two scandals regarding a national
politician’s veracity this week. One is about a president
lying
about his signature, transformative legislative
achievement, while his administration
lies
and
prevaricates
some more in the face of being caught selling the
American public a bill of goods. The second
initially centered around
a senator
lifting movie-description passages from Wikipedia
in his
speeches. You could almost see the thought bubble around Rand
Paul’s head–how could they possibly be nitpicking me in
this of all weeks? But that is exactly the wrong response, both
externally and internally, as new revelations make even more
clear.

First came
word
Sunday that a whole
1,318-word section
of Paul’s book
Government Bullies
was lifted from a Heritage Foundation
study (the think tank just shrugged). The
latest
is that a September Washington Times
op-ed
the senator wrote on mandatory minimums, and also

testimony
he gave on the subject to the Senate Judiciary
Committee, was lifted from a recent piece by Dan
Stewart
in The Week.

Taken together, these sloppy, undergraduate-level infractions
suggest strongly that Sen. Paul is running a loose ship, one not
currently ready for the prime time of winning a national
election.

"GATTACA! GATTACA! GATTACA!" Oh wait, wrong movie. |||“There are technicalities to
this, but nothing I said was not given attribution to where it came
from,” Paul
said prematurely last week
, in response to the first wave of
Wikipedia discoveries. “[People are] making a mountain out of a
molehill….It’s a disagreement about how you footnote things.” By
“people” he especially meant MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, who (along
with Buzzfeed) has been stoking this controversy: “She’s
been spreading hate on me for about three years now,” he
complained. On ABC’s
This Week
on Sunday, Paul even wished out loud he could
challenge his critics to a duel.

There are two fundamental problems to this kind of defensive
response. The first is managerial–what kind of message do you send
staff by waving off such juvenile, 100% avoidable unforced errors
as “technicalities”? That’s like putting up a sign in the office
saying “substandard work welcome here.” In a world of free plagiarism-detection
services
, the time to begin
scrubbing old speeches for possible problems
 was last
week, when the senator was busy lashing out at his critics.

The second problem, which cuts straight to the heart of the
difference between Rand Paul and his dad, is that he’s actually
trying to win the presidency. If your goal is to genuinely
compete in a general election with your once-marginalized ideas,
instead of building a revolutionary movement at the margins, then
you don’t need to be as clean as the competition–you need to be
cleaner. Why? Call it The Weird Man’s Burden.

They'll beat you and they'll treat you like a carnival clown. |||Rand Paul, like his father, has
a lot of “weird” ideas, at least in the cramped context of how
“responsible” two-party politics and governance has played out over
the past several decades. He thinks the drug war is a failure and
has introduced ways to peel it back. He wants to balance the budget
in five years, and slash several federal departments. He believes
in the Fourth Amendment. He is anti-interventionist to the point
that when I asked him repeatedly earlier this summer to name
American military conflicts during his lifetime he would have
retroactively supported, the only he came up with was deposing the
Taliban after 9/11. You and I may think those positions are within
the bands of normality, but libertarians are still
less than one-quarter of the population

The Weird Man (and Woman, bien sur), very crudely
speaking, has two broad avenues available for changing the system:
from within, and from without. Since us weirdos are often, well,
weird, there’s a natural attraction toward hopeless,
beautiful, philosophically pure fires on the sidelines. (This isn’t
libertarian-specific—it’s true of any group whose
issue or issues have been consistently disregarded over time.)
Henry David Thoreau wasn’t trying to fix slavery and imperialistic
war from within Washington, he simply refused to pay his taxes and
headed off into the woods to write. It is emotionally satisfying to
give the finger to The Man, and out there on the margins it is an
affirmation, not an occasion for self-reflection, when the
mainstream and its apologists attack you, whatever the
reason. 

Aaaaaaaaand SCENE! |||The other avenue for Weird Man change-making goes
not into the woods, but into the streets, television screens, and
halls of power. It is an inherently compromising approach–even
Martin Luther King was dismissed in his lifetime as a sellout. As
King and many of the most effective Inside-Gamers have learned,
however, it can be an incredibly effective tactic to present your
claims with more dignity, decorum, and “self-purification” than
the mainstream you aim to change. Think about it–gay rights at
first was the stuff of revolutionaries and outrage-generating
paraders, but the gay marriage debate really took off with
a bullet when those two sweet old ladies got married in San
Francisco. The movement to legalize marijuana by necessity began
with the gray-ponytail crowd, and will end with square-jawed
businessmen in suits
. This is not to state a preference for one
of the two main avenues of change–Rand wouldn’t be a national
politician without Ron’s rEVOLution–but rather to identify the
characteristics of the path that Rand has very obviously
chosen. 

So what does that mean in this instance? If he wants to run for
president, he needs to be better, not worse, and not
merely as good, as the competition when it comes to the most
seemingly trivial matters of comportment. Journalists, particularly
(though not only) from
those outlets
sensitive to the allure that libertarian ideas
have on some progressive voters, will be gunning for every
possible gaffe, glitch, error of judgment, and stated deviance. He
should consider it an honor to be challenged, instead of a
challenge to get huffy about.

Get used to it, Rook. |||People who choose the Inside Game know, or at
least should know, that the deck is stacked against them,
and that they will be judged more harshly. Those were always the
rules. On the upside, being the first real truth-teller inside an
empire of lies carries with it enormous galvanizing potential.
Whining about being picked on in this context is like complaining
about getting fouled when you drive to the hoop against Bill
Laimbeer and Rick Mahorn. The answer is to dunk the damned
basketball, not bitch to the refs. And for god’s sake, make sure
your shoes are tied.

It’s actually helpful for Rand Paul’s presidential ambitions to
be having these mini-kerfuffles in November 2013. It’s doubtful
that they will have any impact on the 2016 race, and he could
clearly use the practice. 

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/05/rand-pauls-plagiarism-and-the-weird-mans
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