Report: Three Pages of Rand Paul's Book Were Plagiarized

Sen. Rand Paul
(R-Ky.) is facing another accusation of plagiarism.

According to BuzzFeed’s Andrew Kaczynski, a whole section of
Paul’s book
Government Bullies
was copied from a 2003 Heritage
Foundation
case study
. The case study is reportedly cited in the book’s
footnotes, but there is no indication or acknowledgement that
the same words from the study were taken and used in the text
of the book.

A spokesman from The Heritage Foundation told BuzzFeed that they
“don’t care” about the copying.

From
BuzzFeed
:

An entire section of Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s 2013
book Government Bullies was copied wholesale
from a 2003 case study by the Heritage Foundation, BuzzFeed
has learned. The copied section, 1,318 words, is by far the most
significant instance reported so far of Paul borrowing language
from other published material.

The new cut-and-paste job follows reports by BuzzFeed, Politico,
and MSNBC that Paul had plagiarized speeches either from Wikipedia
or news reports. The book was published in August 2013 by Center
Street, a division of Hachette Book Group.

The news comes days after Paul was accused of plagiarizing from
the Wikipedia entry on the sci-fi film Gattaca during
a speech at Liberty University. Reason‘s Ron Bailey wrote
on the controversy surrounding the Liberty University speech

here

Paul
has dismissed
 questions surrounding his speech and has
accused MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, who pointed out some of the
similarities between sections of Paul’s speech and the
Gattaca Wikipedia article, of “spreading hate on me for
three years now.”

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Cathy Young on the Lessons of the Maryville Rape Case

Maryville, Mo., has become the
latest battleground in the culture war over rape. That two popular
high school athletes charged with sexual offenses against a
14-year-old girl went free while the girl and her family were
shunned and harassed has ignited a storm of outrage. Cathy Young
contends that those of us who have criticized the radical
zealotry of the feminist war on “rape culture” must acknowledge
that in this instance, the activists are likely helping a good
cause, but they must move beyond an ideology focused on female
victimhood. 

View this article.

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What Do *You* Have to Hide? Highlights from Anti-NSA Rally

 

A week ago, a stunningly transpartisan group of protesters spoke
out against surveillance of American citizens by the National
Security Agency. Hundreds of people joined representatives from
FreeedomWorks, the ACLU, the Electrionic Freedom Foundation, and
other groups to say “Stop Watching Us.”

Click above to watch Reason TV’s video coverage of the event and

go here
for links, resources, and downloadable versions of the
vid. Here’s the original writeup:

On October 26, 2013, protesters from across the political
spectrum gathered in Washington, D.C. to take part in
the Stop Watching
Us
 rally, a demonstration against the National
Security Agency’s domestic and international surveillance
programs. 

Reason TV spoke with protesters – including 2012 Libertarian
Party presidential candidate Gary Johnson and former Congressman
Dennis Kucinich – to discuss the rally, why people should worry
about the erosion of privacy, and President Barack Obama’s role in
the growth of the surveillance state.

CORRECTION: Laura Murphy, Director of the ACLU Washington
Legislative Office, was incorrectly identified as Susan N. Herman,
ACLU President.

Produced by Joshua Swain, interviews by Todd Krainin.

About 3 minutes long. 

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Shikha Dalmia’s Diwali Rumination On Hinduism’s Propensity for Cults and Charlatans

During
the Diwali celebration today, Hindus worldover will celebrate the
victory of good over evil. But this year many of them are wrestling
with the allegations that one of their most popular gurus engaged
in an evil deed: raping the minor daughter of a devotee. He is not
the first guru to go rogue and nor will he be the last. Fake gurus
are an endemic feature of the world’s oldest religion. Shikha
Dalmia ruminates whether this propensity should be regarded as a
defect, or an internal defense against dogmatism.

View this article.

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Shikha Dalmia's Diwali Rumination On Hinduism's Propensity for Cults and Charlatans

During
the Diwali celebration today, Hindus worldover will celebrate the
victory of good over evil. But this year many of them are wrestling
with the allegations that one of their most popular gurus engaged
in an evil deed: raping the minor daughter of a devotee. He is not
the first guru to go rogue and nor will he be the last. Fake gurus
are an endemic feature of the world’s oldest religion. Shikha
Dalmia ruminates whether this propensity should be regarded as a
defect, or an internal defense against dogmatism.

View this article.

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Sheldon Richman Explains the Humanitarian Shortcomings of the Affordable Care Act

Let’s stipulate that most people who favor the
ACA have honorable intentions: they want everyone, including people
in ill health, to have access to good and affordable medical care.
All decent people should want that. Nevertheless, explains Sheldon
Richman, the problem is that in making government policy, unmovable
obstacles often stand between motives and desired results.

View this article.

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Abby Schachter on Pennsylvania’s Swaddling Ban

Swaddled babyPennsylvania, along with several other states,
has changed day care regulations to include a ban on
swaddling. The unelected busybodies who write these rules are
convinced that swaddling isn’t safe because the day care workers
may incorrectly wrap the baby, the blanket could come loose, the
baby might roll over into the loose material, and then the baby
might, possibly, die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). But
there are no known cases of a baby dying at day care from
suffocation by a swaddling blanket. According to Abby Schacter, the
ban is unnecessary, unreasonable, and puts a burden on
both parents and day care workers. 

View this article.

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Abby Schachter on Pennsylvania's Swaddling Ban

Swaddled babyPennsylvania, along with several other states,
has changed day care regulations to include a ban on
swaddling. The unelected busybodies who write these rules are
convinced that swaddling isn’t safe because the day care workers
may incorrectly wrap the baby, the blanket could come loose, the
baby might roll over into the loose material, and then the baby
might, possibly, die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). But
there are no known cases of a baby dying at day care from
suffocation by a swaddling blanket. According to Abby Schacter, the
ban is unnecessary, unreasonable, and puts a burden on
both parents and day care workers. 

View this article.

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How American Healthcare Killed My Father: Q&A with David Goldhill

 

David Goldhill is the head of the Game Show Network – and one of
the most-lucid analysts and unforgiving critics of the American
health care system.

In this interview, produced by Reason TV’s Jim Esptein and
conducted by Kmele Foster, Goldhill talks about his must-read new
book,
Catastrophic Care: How American Health Care Killed My Father–and
How We Can Fix It
,
what’s wrong with Obamacare, and much
more. If you care about the future of medicine and insurance in
this country, watch this interview.

Released on Friday, November 1. Read the original writeup and
get more info by clicking below.

In 2007, David Goldhill’s father was admitted to a New York City
hospital with pneumonia, and five weeks later he died there from
multiple hospital-acquired infections. “I probably would have been
like any other family member dealing with the grief and disbelief,”
says Goldhill, a self-described liberal Democrat who is currently
the CEO of the Game Show Network. “But,” as Goldhill recounts,

A month later there was a
profile
 in The New Yorker of physician
Peter Provonost, who was running around the country with fairly
simple steps for cleanliness and hygiene that could significantly
reduce the hospital-acquired infection rate, but he was having a
hard time getting hospitals to sign up for this. I had helped run a
movie chain, and we had a rule that if a soda spilled, it had to be
cleaned up in five minutes or someone got in trouble. And I thought
to myself, if we can do that to get you not to go to the theater
across the street, why are hospitals having such a hard time doing
simple cost-free things to save lives?

That’s how Goldhill first got interested in the economics of the
American health care system. In 2009, he published a
much-discussed article in The
Atlantic
, which he has now expanded into a book,
titled Catastrophic
Care: How American Health Care Killed My Father–and How We Can Fix
It
.

Goldhill argues that the major problem in health care is a
system of incentives that puts most of the purchasing power in the
hands of insurance companies and the government, while cutting
patients out of the equation. This system isn’t just costing us a
lot of money, it’s killing us. As Goldhill explains, there’s a
direct link between the way we pay for health care and the
estimated 100,000 patients in the U.S. who die every year from
infections they picked up in hospital.

Reason TV Contributor Kmele Foster sat down with Goldhill to
discuss the problems in our health care system and why turning
patients back into customers will go a long way towards solving
them.

Produced, shot, and edited by Jim Epstein. Additional camera by
Anthony Fisher.

About 30 minutes.

Scroll down for downloadable versions and subscribe
to Reason TV’s
YouTube Channel
to receive automatic updates when new material
goes live.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/02/how-american-healthcare-killed-my-father
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How American Healthcare Killed My Father: Q&A with David Goldhill

 

David Goldhill is the head of the Game Show Network – and one of
the most-lucid analysts and unforgiving critics of the American
health care system.

In this interview, produced by Reason TV’s Jim Esptein and
conducted by Kmele Foster, Goldhill talks about his must-read new
book,
Catastrophic Care: How American Health Care Killed My Father–and
How We Can Fix It
,
what’s wrong with Obamacare, and much
more. If you care about the future of medicine and insurance in
this country, watch this interview.

Released on Friday, November 1. Read the original writeup and
get more info by clicking below.

In 2007, David Goldhill’s father was admitted to a New York City
hospital with pneumonia, and five weeks later he died there from
multiple hospital-acquired infections. “I probably would have been
like any other family member dealing with the grief and disbelief,”
says Goldhill, a self-described liberal Democrat who is currently
the CEO of the Game Show Network. “But,” as Goldhill recounts,

A month later there was a
profile
 in The New Yorker of physician
Peter Provonost, who was running around the country with fairly
simple steps for cleanliness and hygiene that could significantly
reduce the hospital-acquired infection rate, but he was having a
hard time getting hospitals to sign up for this. I had helped run a
movie chain, and we had a rule that if a soda spilled, it had to be
cleaned up in five minutes or someone got in trouble. And I thought
to myself, if we can do that to get you not to go to the theater
across the street, why are hospitals having such a hard time doing
simple cost-free things to save lives?

That’s how Goldhill first got interested in the economics of the
American health care system. In 2009, he published a
much-discussed article in The
Atlantic
, which he has now expanded into a book,
titled Catastrophic
Care: How American Health Care Killed My Father–and How We Can Fix
It
.

Goldhill argues that the major problem in health care is a
system of incentives that puts most of the purchasing power in the
hands of insurance companies and the government, while cutting
patients out of the equation. This system isn’t just costing us a
lot of money, it’s killing us. As Goldhill explains, there’s a
direct link between the way we pay for health care and the
estimated 100,000 patients in the U.S. who die every year from
infections they picked up in hospital.

Reason TV Contributor Kmele Foster sat down with Goldhill to
discuss the problems in our health care system and why turning
patients back into customers will go a long way towards solving
them.

Produced, shot, and edited by Jim Epstein. Additional camera by
Anthony Fisher.

About 30 minutes.

Scroll down for downloadable versions and subscribe
to Reason TV’s
YouTube Channel
to receive automatic updates when new material
goes live.

from Hit & Run http://reason.com/blog/2013/11/02/how-american-healthcare-killed-my-father
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