Photos Emerge Of 10 "Active Militia Teams" Securing The US-Mexico Border

With 1000s of illegal immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border every day (perhaps even more now some of the border has been washed away), the government quietly dumping them in Tennessee (among other places), and current (recently constructed border protection infrastructure already breaking down), it appears the American people are taking matters into their own hands. Photos showing dozens of members of militia groups on the U.S.-Mexico border carrying semi-automatic rifles and wearing masks, camouflage and tactical gear provide one of the first glimpses into the group's activities on the border. The groups, including Oathkeepers, Three Percenters and Patriots, began recruiting and organizing more than a month ago and recent Facebook entries provide more color on their perspective: "You see an illegal. You point your gun dead at him, right between his eyes, and you say, 'Get back across the border or you will be shot.' …We are not worried about an 'International' incident."

 

It appears the American people is growing frustrated as the government's inaction… or in some cases action…

As Fox reports, the Obama administration recently released 760 illegal immigrant children to sponsors in the Volunteer State without any warning, the governor charged.

 

There was not so much as a text message or tweet.

 

“It is unacceptable that we became aware via a posting on the HHS website that 760 unaccompanied children have been released by the Office of Refugee Resettlement to sponsors in Tennessee  without my administration’s knowledge,” the governor wrote in a strongly-worded letter to President Obama.

 

The Office of Refugee Resettlement says sponsors are typically a parent or relative who can care for the illegal immigrant child while their immigration case is processed. All sponsors are required to undergo background checks.

 

It’s also unclear why the ORR is handling the children – since they are illegal immigrants and not refugees.

 

It’s been the Obama administration’s standard operating procedure to release the illegals into states without notifying local or state government officials.

And the current government-provided border protection infrastructure is already breaking down

An unusual amount of rain that ravaged parts of southern Arizona also knocked down 60 feet of the rebar-reinforced steel fence that divides the U.S. and Mexico.

 

 

The storms began Friday in Sonora, Mexico, and resumed Saturday night until Sunday morning, when debris from the Mexican side of the border traveled through a wash and piled up against the border fence. The fence, just west of the Nogales-Mariposa Port of Entry near Interstate 19, stood between 18 and 26 feet high and extended at least 7 feet underground.

 

 

The fence was built in 2011. It is constantly monitored by agents because smugglers and others who attempt to cross illegally routinely try to breach or knock down parts of it.

 

"It had a lot of water behind it, and it just pushed the fence straight down," said John Hays, floodplain coordinator for the Santa Cruz County Flood Control District. "If you're fencing is tight enough to catch debris, it basically becomes a dam. It's not meant to withstand those loads of water."

 

Hays said the fence appears to have floodgates, but they did not open.

So a number of locals have taken the challenge upon themselves. As Chron reports, photos showing dozens of members of militia groups on the U.S.-Mexico border carrying semi-automatic rifles and wearing masks, camouflage and tactical gear provide one of the first glimpses into the group's activities on the border.

Members of the militia groups, who say they have 10 active "teams" along the state's southern border, are seen at campsites, walking along the Rio Grande River, pointing rifles and pistols out of frame and flipping off the camera in the photos obtained by the San Antonio Express-News.

 

A spokesperson for the group provided the photos under the condition that members' faces be blurred because of fear of being identified by "cartel and gang members."

 

 

The groups, including Oathkeepers, Three Percenters and Patriots, began recruiting and organizing more than a month ago, as national media outlets began focusing on an influx of Central American immigrants illegally crossing the border, including more than 50,000 unaccompanied minors.

 

 

Some Facebook comments from members of the militias indicate the groups are not fearful of using force.

 

"(Rules of Engagement) is if in fear of bodily injury, weapons free, if fired upon, return fire. Real simple," member KC Massey posted along with a photo on Facebook. "We are not worried about an "International" incident if they shoot at us."

 

In an interview with the Express-News, Chris Davis, commander of the militia's "Operation Secure Our Border: Laredo Sector", who is seen in some of the photos, said members would secure the border in a "legal and lawful manner."

 

However, in a since-deleted 21-minute YouTube video of Davis, he said: "How? You see an illegal. You point your gun dead at him, right between his eyes, and you say, 'Get back across the border or you will be shot.'"

State Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, denounced the militia groups in a statement, saying "pointing guns at children solves nothing."

"Local law enforcement and federal border patrol agents have been clear. The presence of these outside independent militia groups does nothing to secure the border; it only creates an unsafe situation for law enforcement officials that are protecting our communities. Unfortunately, the vile rhetoric of my opponent inspires misguided efforts," said Van de Putte, who is running against state Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston, for lieutenant governor.

See more images here…

 

 

See more images here…




via Zero Hedge http://ift.tt/1qdPIrc Tyler Durden

Photos Emerge Of 10 “Active Militia Teams” Securing The US-Mexico Border

With 1000s of illegal immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border every day (perhaps even more now some of the border has been washed away), the government quietly dumping them in Tennessee (among other places), and current (recently constructed border protection infrastructure already breaking down), it appears the American people are taking matters into their own hands. Photos showing dozens of members of militia groups on the U.S.-Mexico border carrying semi-automatic rifles and wearing masks, camouflage and tactical gear provide one of the first glimpses into the group's activities on the border. The groups, including Oathkeepers, Three Percenters and Patriots, began recruiting and organizing more than a month ago and recent Facebook entries provide more color on their perspective: "You see an illegal. You point your gun dead at him, right between his eyes, and you say, 'Get back across the border or you will be shot.' …We are not worried about an 'International' incident."

 

It appears the American people is growing frustrated as the government's inaction… or in some cases action…

As Fox reports, the Obama administration recently released 760 illegal immigrant children to sponsors in the Volunteer State without any warning, the governor charged.

 

There was not so much as a text message or tweet.

 

“It is unacceptable that we became aware via a posting on the HHS website that 760 unaccompanied children have been released by the Office of Refugee Resettlement to sponsors in Tennessee  without my administration’s knowledge,” the governor wrote in a strongly-worded letter to President Obama.

 

The Office of Refugee Resettlement says sponsors are typically a parent or relative who can care for the illegal immigrant child while their immigration case is processed. All sponsors are required to undergo background checks.

 

It’s also unclear why the ORR is handling the children – since they are illegal immigrants and not refugees.

 

It’s been the Obama administration’s standard operating procedure to release the illegals into states without notifying local or state government officials.

And the current government-provided border protection infrastructure is already breaking down

An unusual amount of rain that ravaged parts of southern Arizona also knocked down 60 feet of the rebar-reinforced steel fence that divides the U.S. and Mexico.

 

 

The storms began Friday in Sonora, Mexico, and resumed Saturday night until Sunday morning, when debris from the Mexican side of the border traveled through a wash and piled up against the border fence. The fence, just west of the Nogales-Mariposa Port of Entry near Interstate 19, stood between 18 and 26 feet high and extended at least 7 feet underground.

 

 

The fence was built in 2011. It is constantly monitored by agents because smugglers and others who attempt to cross illegally routinely try to breach or knock down parts of it.

 

"It had a lot of water behind it, and it just pushed the fence straight down," said John Hays, floodplain coordinator for the Santa Cruz County Flood Control District. "If you're fencing is tight enough to catch debris, it basically becomes a dam. It's not meant to withstand those loads of water."

 

Hays said the fence appears to have floodgates, but they did not open.

So a number of locals have taken the challenge upon themselves. As Chron reports, photos showing dozens of members of militia groups on the U.S.-Mexico border carrying semi-automatic rifles and wearing masks, camouflage and tactical gear provide one of the first glimpses into the group's activities on the border.

Members of the militia groups, who say they have 10 active "teams" along the state's southern border, are seen at campsites, walking along the Rio Grande River, pointing rifles and pistols out of frame and flipping off the camera in the photos obtained by the San Antonio Express-News.

 

A spokesperson for the group provided the photos under the condition that members' faces be blurred because of fear of being identified by "cartel and gang members."

 

 

The groups, including Oathkeepers, Three Percenters and Patriots, began recruiting and organizing more than a month ago, as national media outlets began focusing on an influx of Central American immigrants illegally crossing the border, including more than 50,000 unaccompanied minors.

 

 

Some Facebook comments from members of the militias indicate the groups are not fearful of using force.

 

"(Rules of Engagement) is if in fear of bodily injury, weapons free, if fired upon, return fire. Real simple," member KC Massey posted along with a photo on Facebook. "We are not worried about an "International" incident if they shoot at us."

 

In an interview with the Express-News, Chris Davis, commander of the militia's "Operation Secure Our Border: Laredo Sector", who is seen in some of the photos, said members would secure the border in a "legal and lawful manner."

 

However, in a since-deleted 21-minute YouTube video of Davis, he said: "How? You see an illegal. You point your gun dead at him, right between his eyes, and you say, 'Get back across the border or you will be shot.'"

State Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, denounced the militia groups in a statement, saying "pointing guns at children solves nothing."

"Local law enforcement and federal border patrol agents have been clear. The presence of these outside independent militia groups does nothing to secure the border; it only creates an unsafe situation for law enforcement officials that are protecting our communities. Unfortunately, the vile rhetoric of my opponent inspires misguided efforts," said Van de Putte, who is running against state Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston, for lieutenant governor.

See more images here…

 

 

See more images here…




via Zero Hedge http://ift.tt/1qdPIrc Tyler Durden

Asset Forfeiture – How To Steal Americans' Hard Earned Cash With Zero Repercussions

Submitted by Mike Krieger of Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

Almost exactly one year ago today, I published a post which went on to become extremely popular titled: Why You Should Never, Ever Drive Through Tenaha, Texas. If you failed to read it the first time around, I suggest you take look as it provides a good outline of just what is at stake when it comes to this destructive and abusive practice increasingly utilized by police departments across these United States with zero repercussions for the offending officers. In last years article I noted that:

In a nutshell, civil forfeiture is the practice of confiscating items from people, ranging from cash, cars, even homes based on no criminal conviction or charges, merely suspicion.

 

This practice first became widespread for use against pirates, as a way to take possession of contraband goods despite the fact that the ships’ owners in many cases were located thousands of miles away and couldn’t easily be prosecuted. As is often the case, what starts out reasonable becomes a gigantic organized crime ring of criminality, particularly in a society where the rule of law no longer exists for the “elite,” yet anything goes when it comes to pillaging the average citizen.

 

One of the major reasons these programs have become so abused is that the police departments themselves are able to keep much of the confiscated money. So they actually have a perverse incentive to steal. As might be expected, a program that is often touted as being effective against going after major drug kingpins, actually targets the poor and disenfranchised more than anything else.

While this epidemic of law enforcement theft is problematic throughout the country (see these egregious examples from Tennessee and Michigan), it appears Texas has a particularly keen love affair with the practice. Not only did last year’s story take place in Texas, today’s highlighted episode also takes place in the Lone Star State. This time in a town of 150 people called Estelline, which earns more than 89% of its gross revenues from traffic fines and forfeitures. In other words, from theft. 

Here’s a little background on this particular story. From the Armarillo Globe News:

The city of Estelline is reviewing its police procedures after Hall County authorities reached a $77,500 legal settlement with an Azle woman who alleged officers illegally seized more than $29,000 from her pickup and kept $1,400 of her cash.

 

Fry, who was parked just past a speed limit sign in the tiny Hall County town, stopped Dutton that November evening for traveling 61 mph in a 50-mph traffic zone. Fry, the city’s lone police officer, asked to search Dutton’s pickup, but she refused. The officer then contacted Jolly, who drove “Kilo,” a drug sniffing canine, to Estelline about 30 minutes later, according to court records and deposition testimony.

So the cops set up a speed trap and then use it as an excuse to illegally confiscate citizens’ property. Kill two revenue birds with one stone.

Fry told Jolly he thought he smelled raw marijuana in the pickup and that he thought Dutton was acting nervously. The drug dog “hit” on the vehicle and the officers found more than $29,000 inside Dutton’s purse, still bundled in bank currency wrapping. Dutton told officers she didn’t do drugs and denied having any marijuana in her truck. She told officers the cash came from a recent property sale, and no drugs were found during the search.

 

During the stop, the Memphis police chief reportedly contacted Dutton’s two sisters, who confirmed her account that the money was received from a recent real estate transaction. Jolly, according to court records, then called an experienced local criminal investigator, who advised that officers did not have enough evidence to justify Dutton’s arrest. After consulting with Jolly, Fry arrested Dutton, who was held overnight and bonded out the next day.

 

“The city of Memphis claims they destroyed their copy of that recorded interrogation. The city of Estelline says they didn’t make any such video or audio recording of Dutton’s roadside interrogations; only Memphis did,” court records show.

 

In a deposition, Estelline City Manager Richard Ferguson said the city, which has about 150 residents, had no written drug dog policy, no written arrest policy and no established forfeiture policy. The city also maintained no written records of past searches or seizures, yet traffic fines and forfeitures made up more than 89 percent of its gross revenues in fiscal year 2012.

 

“We vigorously defended the lawsuit and believe that both Chief Jolly and former Officer Fry as well as both of the cities did nothing to violate Ms. Dutton’s constitutional rights, but recognizing the uncertainties of continuing with litigation, all the parties agreed that a settlement was in their best interest,” Reno said. “The city of Estelline City Council is reviewing their current policies and procedures and exploring whether to adopt a new policy and procedure manual with respect to the operation of the police department.”

“I feel that I was roped, corralled and branded and put out to pasture as a felon,” she said.

There is so much wrong here I almost don’t know where to begin. This one case highlights so many of the destructive practices happening in the U.S. today, it is as if this tiny Texas town serves as a microcosm for so much that is wrong with America. Let’s start with the drug dog.

Americans are increasingly becoming familiar with their Constitutional rights, particularly the 4th Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable search and seizure. Cops don’t like this one bit. Whereas in the recent past most Americans might simply allow a law enforcement officer to search his or her car upon request, many more citizens are likely refusing such intrusions. This is where drug dogs come in to provide “probable cause.” The problem here is that many drug dogs are signaling a “drug  hit” when there are no drugs present. This provides a convenient excuse for any officer to search any car at any time.

A great example of this practice was demonstrated in the July 4th video of a police stop in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, which has over 5 million views on YouTube. Once it became clear to the officer that the citizen who was pulled over knew his rights, the cop brought out a police dog that signaled drugs as an excuse to search the vehicle. No drugs were found. So either something is wrong with the dog, or the whole practice is a bullshit excuse for fascism. You know where I stand.

If you think that example is just a one-off, think agai
n.
One of the most horrific instances of non-leathal police abuse last year was the story of David Eckert, the New Mexico man for whom a routine traffic stop turned into a nightmare of torture, including multiple involuntary anal probes. The police dog that “sniffed drugs” and kicked off the entire episode wasn’t even certified to sniff for drugs in the state of New Mexico at the time. His certification expired two years earlier, but that didn’t stop local police from using it to harass and torture state residents.

The second major problem is officialdoms’ chronic “destruction of evidence” once it gets caught behaving criminally. Nothing epitomizes this more than the ridiculous destruction of hard drives pertaining to the ongoing IRS scandal. In a similar fashion, the city of Memphis in the above story “claims they destroyed their copy of that recorded interrogation.” How convenient. I’m sure the “dog ate my homework” excuse doesn’t work too well for the plebs when the IRS comes after you. Once again, the “elite” and their henchmen (like cops) can get away with anything, while the citizenry is increasingly “guilty until proven innocent.” Even when they are proven innocent, the guilty parties in officialdom, Wall Street, or corporate America are never, ever held to account with prison sentences, which would serve as the only real deterrent to serious white-collar crimes.

This brings us to the third point. Settlements. Settlements are what people in power are increasingly subject to once their criminality has been exposed. The absolute worst case scenario is a settlement, which does nothing to deter bad behavior. In fact, as many others have also noted, it actually encourages it. A Wall Street employee at a TBTF firm who knows the worst thing that will happen if he gets caught is his employer will pay a fine, will be incentivized to commit as much fraud as possible. The rewards are a lifestyle worthy of a Medieval king, while the punishment is a slap on the corporate wrist. They will take that trade any day. Unsurprisingly, when it became clear the cops in the above case would lose at trial, they merely “settled.”

Now here’s the worst part about these “settlements.” As you might expect, nothing changes systemically. The bad practices continue undeterred. For example, despite the fact that the city of Estillene has “no written drug dog policy, no written arrest policy and no established forfeiture policy,” the most they have committed to is: “Estelline City Council is reviewing their current policies and procedures and exploring whether to adopt a new policy and procedure manual with respect to the operation of the police department.” So in the face of a gross violation of a resident’s constitutional rights, the local police department’s response is basically “we’ll think about it.”

Finally, there is just the gross incompetence. Although the police department admittedly has no written drug dog, arrest or forfeiture policy, there is a little something called the Constitution of the United States of America, a document with which the police department appears entirely unfamiliar. What about the fact that the police corroborated her story with her sisters at the stop, and were even told by a local criminal investigator that they did not have cause to arrest her, yet they still went ahead and held her overnight.

Most importantly, what if she didn’t have the wherewithal to know her rights in the first place? What if she didn’t fight back? What if she didn’t initiate a lawsuit?

Would we even know? Do we even care?

Full article here.




via Zero Hedge http://ift.tt/1oDWnwM Tyler Durden

Asset Forfeiture – How To Steal Americans’ Hard Earned Cash With Zero Repercussions

Submitted by Mike Krieger of Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

Almost exactly one year ago today, I published a post which went on to become extremely popular titled: Why You Should Never, Ever Drive Through Tenaha, Texas. If you failed to read it the first time around, I suggest you take look as it provides a good outline of just what is at stake when it comes to this destructive and abusive practice increasingly utilized by police departments across these United States with zero repercussions for the offending officers. In last years article I noted that:

In a nutshell, civil forfeiture is the practice of confiscating items from people, ranging from cash, cars, even homes based on no criminal conviction or charges, merely suspicion.

 

This practice first became widespread for use against pirates, as a way to take possession of contraband goods despite the fact that the ships’ owners in many cases were located thousands of miles away and couldn’t easily be prosecuted. As is often the case, what starts out reasonable becomes a gigantic organized crime ring of criminality, particularly in a society where the rule of law no longer exists for the “elite,” yet anything goes when it comes to pillaging the average citizen.

 

One of the major reasons these programs have become so abused is that the police departments themselves are able to keep much of the confiscated money. So they actually have a perverse incentive to steal. As might be expected, a program that is often touted as being effective against going after major drug kingpins, actually targets the poor and disenfranchised more than anything else.

While this epidemic of law enforcement theft is problematic throughout the country (see these egregious examples from Tennessee and Michigan), it appears Texas has a particularly keen love affair with the practice. Not only did last year’s story take place in Texas, today’s highlighted episode also takes place in the Lone Star State. This time in a town of 150 people called Estelline, which earns more than 89% of its gross revenues from traffic fines and forfeitures. In other words, from theft. 

Here’s a little background on this particular story. From the Armarillo Globe News:

The city of Estelline is reviewing its police procedures after Hall County authorities reached a $77,500 legal settlement with an Azle woman who alleged officers illegally seized more than $29,000 from her pickup and kept $1,400 of her cash.

 

Fry, who was parked just past a speed limit sign in the tiny Hall County town, stopped Dutton that November evening for traveling 61 mph in a 50-mph traffic zone. Fry, the city’s lone police officer, asked to search Dutton’s pickup, but she refused. The officer then contacted Jolly, who drove “Kilo,” a drug sniffing canine, to Estelline about 30 minutes later, according to court records and deposition testimony.

So the cops set up a speed trap and then use it as an excuse to illegally confiscate citizens’ property. Kill two revenue birds with one stone.

Fry told Jolly he thought he smelled raw marijuana in the pickup and that he thought Dutton was acting nervously. The drug dog “hit” on the vehicle and the officers found more than $29,000 inside Dutton’s purse, still bundled in bank currency wrapping. Dutton told officers she didn’t do drugs and denied having any marijuana in her truck. She told officers the cash came from a recent property sale, and no drugs were found during the search.

 

During the stop, the Memphis police chief reportedly contacted Dutton’s two sisters, who confirmed her account that the money was received from a recent real estate transaction. Jolly, according to court records, then called an experienced local criminal investigator, who advised that officers did not have enough evidence to justify Dutton’s arrest. After consulting with Jolly, Fry arrested Dutton, who was held overnight and bonded out the next day.

 

“The city of Memphis claims they destroyed their copy of that recorded interrogation. The city of Estelline says they didn’t make any such video or audio recording of Dutton’s roadside interrogations; only Memphis did,” court records show.

 

In a deposition, Estelline City Manager Richard Ferguson said the city, which has about 150 residents, had no written drug dog policy, no written arrest policy and no established forfeiture policy. The city also maintained no written records of past searches or seizures, yet traffic fines and forfeitures made up more than 89 percent of its gross revenues in fiscal year 2012.

 

“We vigorously defended the lawsuit and believe that both Chief Jolly and former Officer Fry as well as both of the cities did nothing to violate Ms. Dutton’s constitutional rights, but recognizing the uncertainties of continuing with litigation, all the parties agreed that a settlement was in their best interest,” Reno said. “The city of Estelline City Council is reviewing their current policies and procedures and exploring whether to adopt a new policy and procedure manual with respect to the operation of the police department.”

“I feel that I was roped, corralled and branded and put out to pasture as a felon,” she said.

There is so much wrong here I almost don’t know where to begin. This one case highlights so many of the destructive practices happening in the U.S. today, it is as if this tiny Texas town serves as a microcosm for so much that is wrong with America. Let’s start with the drug dog.

Americans are increasingly becoming familiar with their Constitutional rights, particularly the 4th Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable search and seizure. Cops don’t like this one bit. Whereas in the recent past most Americans might simply allow a law enforcement officer to search his or her car upon request, many more citizens are likely refusing such intrusions. This is where drug dogs come in to provide “probable cause.” The problem here is that many drug dogs are signaling a “drug  hit” when there are no drugs present. This provides a convenient excuse for any officer to search any car at any time.

A great example of this practice was demonstrated in the July 4th video of a police stop in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, which has over 5 million views on YouTube. Once it became clear to the officer that the citizen who was pulled over knew his rights, the cop brought out a police dog that signaled drugs as an excuse to search the vehicle. No drugs were found. So either something is wrong with the dog, or the whole practice is a bullshit excuse for fascism. You know where I stand.

If you think that example is just a one-off, think again. One of the most horrific instances of non-leathal police abuse last year was the story of David Eckert, the New Mexico man for whom a routine traffic stop turned into a nightmare of torture, including multiple involuntary anal probes. The police dog that “sniffed drugs” and kicked off the entire episode wasn’t even certified to sniff for drugs in the state of New Mexico at the time. His certification expired two years earlier, but that didn’t stop local police from using it to harass and torture state residents.

The second major problem is officialdoms’ chronic “destruction of evidence” once it gets caught behaving criminally. Nothing epitomizes this more than the ridiculous destruction of hard drives pertaining to the ongoing IRS scandal. In a similar fashion, the city of Memphis in the above story “claims they destroyed their copy of that recorded interrogation.” How convenient. I’m sure the “dog ate my homework” excuse doesn’t work too well for the plebs when the IRS comes after you. Once again, the “elite” and their henchmen (like cops) can get away with anything, while the citizenry is increasingly “guilty until proven innocent.” Even when they are proven innocent, the guilty parties in officialdom, Wall Street, or corporate America are never, ever held to account with prison sentences, which would serve as the only real deterrent to serious white-collar crimes.

This brings us to the third point. Settlements. Settlements are what people in power are increasingly subject to once their criminality has been exposed. The absolute worst case scenario is a settlement, which does nothing to deter bad behavior. In fact, as many others have also noted, it actually encourages it. A Wall Street employee at a TBTF firm who knows the worst thing that will happen if he gets caught is his employer will pay a fine, will be incentivized to commit as much fraud as possible. The rewards are a lifestyle worthy of a Medieval king, while the punishment is a slap on the corporate wrist. They will take that trade any day. Unsurprisingly, when it became clear the cops in the above case would lose at trial, they merely “settled.”

Now here’s the worst part about these “settlements.” As you might expect, nothing changes systemically. The bad practices continue undeterred. For example, despite the fact that the city of Estillene has “no written drug dog policy, no written arrest policy and no established forfeiture policy,” the most they have committed to is: “Estelline City Council is reviewing their current policies and procedures and exploring whether to adopt a new policy and procedure manual with respect to the operation of the police department.” So in the face of a gross violation of a resident’s constitutional rights, the local police department’s response is basically “we’ll think about it.”

Finally, there is just the gross incompetence. Although the police department admittedly has no written drug dog, arrest or forfeiture policy, there is a little something called the Constitution of the United States of America, a document with which the police department appears entirely unfamiliar. What about the fact that the police corroborated her story with her sisters at the stop, and were even told by a local criminal investigator that they did not have cause to arrest her, yet they still went ahead and held her overnight.

Most importantly, what if she didn’t have the wherewithal to know her rights in the first place? What if she didn’t fight back? What if she didn’t initiate a lawsuit?

Would we even know? Do we even care?

Full article here.




via Zero Hedge http://ift.tt/1oDWnwM Tyler Durden

Is This China's QE?

Shortly after we exposed the real liquidity crisis facing Chinese banks recently (when no repo occurred and money market rates surged), China (very quietly) announced CNY 1 trillion of 'Pledged Supplementary Lending' (PSL) by the PBOC to China Development Bank. This first use of the facility "smacks of quantitative easing" according to StanChart's Stephen Green, noting it is "deliberate and significant expansion of the PBOC's balance sheet via creating bank reserves/cash" and likens the exercise to the UK's Funding For Lending scheme. BofA is less convinced of the PBOC's quantitative loosening, suggesting it is more like a targeted line of credit (focused on lowering the costs of funding) and arguing with a record "asset" creation by Chinese banks in Q1 does China really need standalone QE?

 

China still has a liquidity crisis without the help of the PBOC… (when last week the PBOC did not inject liquidty via repo, money market rates spiked to six-month highs…)

 

 

And so the PBOC decided to unleash PSL (via BofA)

The China Business News (CBN, 18 June), suggests that the PBoC has been preparing a new monetary policy tool named “Pledged Supplementary Lending” (PSL) as a new facility to provide base money and to guide medium-term interest rates. Within the big picture of interest rate liberalization, the central banks may wish to have a series of policy instruments at hand, guaranteeing the smooth transition of the monetary policy making framework from quantity tools towards price tools.

 

PSL: a new tool for base money creation

 

Since end-1990s, China’s major source of base money expansion was through PBoC’s purchase of FX exchanges, but money created from FX inflows outpaced money demand of the economy. To sterilize excess inflows, the PBoC imposed quite high required reserve ratio (RRR) for banks at 17.5-20.0% currently, and issued its own bills to banks to lock up cash. With FX inflows most likely to slow after CNY/USD stopped its one-way appreciation and China’s current account surplus narrowed, there could be less need for sterilization. The PBoC may instead need to expand its monetary base with sources other than FX inflows, and PSL could become an important tool in this regard.

 

…and a tool for impacting medium-term policy rate

 

Moreover, we interpret the introduction of the PSL as echoing the remarks by PBoC Governor Zhou Xiaochuan in a Finance Forum this May that “the policy tool could be a short-term policy rate or a range of it, possibly plus a medium-term interest rate”. The PBoC is likely to gradually set short-term interbank rates as new benchmark rates while using a new policy scheme similar to the rate corridor operating frameworks currently used in dozens of other economies. A medium-term policy rate could be desirable for helping the transmission of short-term policy rate to longer tenors so that the PBoC could manage financing costs for the real economy.

 

Key features of PSL

 

Through PSL, the PBoC could provide liquidity with maturity of 3-month to a few years to commercial banks for credit expansion. In some way, it could be similar to relending, and it’s reported that the PBoC has recently provided relending to several policy and commercial banks to support credit to certain areas, such as public infrastructure, social housing, rural sector and smaller enterprises.

 

However, PSL could be designed more sophisticatedly and serve a much bigger monetary role compared to relending.

 

First, no collateral is required for relending so there is credit risk associated with it. By contrast, PSL most likely will require certain types of eligible collaterals from banks.

 

Second, the information disclosure for relending is quite discretionary, and the market may not know the timing, amount and interest rates of relending. If the PBoC wishes to use PSL to guide medium-term market rate, the PBoC perhaps need to set up proper mechanism to disclose PSL operations.

 

Third, relending nowadays is mostly used by the PBoC to support specific sectors or used as emergency funding facility to certain banks. PSL could be a standing liquidity facility, at least for a considerable period of time during China’s interest rate liberalization.

Some think China's PSL Is QE (via Market News International reports),

Standard Chartered economist Stephen Green says in a note that reports of the CNY1 trillion in Pledged Supplementary Lending (PSL) that the People's Bank of China recently conducted in the market smacks of quantitative easing. He notes that the funds which have been relent to China Development Bank are "deliberate and significant expansion of the PBOC's balance sheet via creating bank reserves/cash" and likens the exercise to the UK's Funding For Lending scheme. CDB's balance sheet reflects the transfer of funds, even if the PBOC's doesn't.

 

The CNY1 trillion reported — no details confirmed by the PBOC yet — will wind up in the broader economy and boost demand and "sends a signal that the PBOC is in the mood for quantitative loosening," Green writes

 

The impact will depend on whether the details are correct and if all the funds have been transferred already, or if it's just a jumped up credit facility that CDB will be allowed to tap in stages.

But BofA believes it is more likely a targeted rate cut tool (via BofA)

The investment community and media are assessing the possible form and consequence of the first case of Pledged Supplementary Lending (PSL) by PBoC to China Development Bank (CDB). The planned total amount of RMB1.0tn of PSL is more like a line of credit rather than a direct Quantitative Easing (QE). The new facility can be understood as a “targeted rate cut” rather than QE. We reckon that only some amount has been withdrawn by CDB so far. Despite its initial focus on shantytown redevelopment, we believe the lending could boost the overall liquidity and offer extra help to interbank market. Depending on its timespan of depletion, the actual impact on growth could be limited but sufficient to help deliver the growth target.

 

Relending/PSL to CDB yet to be confirmed

 

The reported debut of PSL was not a straightforward one. The initial news report by China Business News gave no clues on many of the details of the deal expect for the total amount and purpose of the lending. With the limited information, we believe the lending arrangement is most likely a credit line offered by PBoC to CDB. The total amount of RMB1.0tn was not likely being used already even for a strong June money and credit data. According to PBoC balance sh
eet, its claims to other financial institutions increased by RMB150bn in April and May. If the full amount has been withdrawn by CDB, it is equivalent to say PBoC conducted RMB850bn net injection via CDB in June, since CDB has to park the massive deposits in commercial banks. We assess the amount could be too big for the market as the interbank rates were still rising to the mid-year regulatory assessment. The PBoC could disclose the June balance after first week of August, we expect some increase of PBoC’s claims on banks, but would be much less than RMB850bn.

 

Difference with expected one

 

In our introductory PSL report, we argue that the operation has its root in policy reform of major central banks. However, we do not wish to compare literally with these existing instruments, namely ECB’s TLTRO or BoE’s FLS. Admittedly, the PBoC has its discretion to design the tailor-made currency arrangement due to the special nature of policy need. However, the opaque operation of PSL will eventually prove it a temporary arrangement and perhaps not serving as an example for other PSLs for its initial policy design to be achieved. According to Governor Zhou, the PSL is supposed to provide a reference to medium-term interest rate, which is missing in today’s case.

 

The focus is lowering cost of funding

 

We have been arguing that relending is a Chinese version of QE. Although relending is granted to certain banks, but there is no restriction on how banks use the funding. However, we believe PSL is more than that. The purpose of CDB’s PSL has been narrowed down to shantytown redevelopment, an area usually demands fiscal budget or subsidy in the past. Funding cost is the key to this arrangement.

 

Indeed, the PBoC has been working hard to reduce the cost of funding in the economy since massive easing is not an option under the increasing leverage of the economy. A currency-depreciation easing has been initiated by PBoC to bring down the interbank rate. Since then the central bank carefully manages the OMO in order to prevent liquidity squeeze from happening. On 24 July, State Council and CBRC have introduced workable measures to reduce funding cost of small and micro-enterprises.

 

Impact of the lending

 

PSL is not a direct QE, but there could be some side effect by this targeted lending. PSL to CDB means the funding demand and provision come hand-inhand. Targeted credit easing by nature is a requirement by targeted areas demanding policy support, which could be SMEs, infrastructure or social housing. In this regard, it is not surprising to see more PSL to support infrastructure financing. In addition to the direct impact on those targeted areas, we expect the overall funding cost could benefit from liquidity spillover.

 

Market reaction

 

Since the news about PSL with CDB last Monday, we have seen a rally in the Shanghai Composite Index. However we believe multiple factors may have contributed to the rebound in the stock market including: (1) better than expected macro data in 2Q/June and HSBC PMI surprising on the upside leading to improved sentiment; (2) The State Council and the CBRC have introduced measures to reduce funding cost of small and micro-enterprises; (3) More property easing with the removal of home purchase restrictions in several cities. PSL could have contributed to the improved sentiment on expectation of further easing.

Since as we noted previously, China's massive bank asset creation (dwarfing the US) hardly looks like it needs QE…

As Bank Assets exploded in Q1…

 

dramatically outpacing the US…

 

Unless something really bad is going on that needs an even bigger bucket of liquidity.

*  *  *

So whatever way you look at it, the PBOC thinks China needs more credit (through one channel or another) to keep the ponzi alive. Anyone still harboring any belief in reform, rotation to consumerism is sadly mistaken. One day of illiquidity appears to have been enough to prove that they need to keep the pipes wide open. The question is where that hot money flows as they clamp down (or not) on external funding channels.

Notably CNY has strengthened recently as the PSL appears to have encouraged flows back into China.

*  *  *

The plot thickened a little this evening as China news reports:

  • *CBRC ALLOWS CHINA DEV. BANK TO START HOUSING FINANCE BUSINESS
  • *CHINA APPROVES CDB'S HOME FINANCE DEPT TO START BUSINESS: NEWS

Thus it appears the PSL is a QE/funding channel directly aimed at supporting housing. CNY 1 trillion to start and maybe China is trying to create a "Fannie-Mae" for China.




via Zero Hedge http://ift.tt/1rVrWmM Tyler Durden

Is This China’s QE?

Shortly after we exposed the real liquidity crisis facing Chinese banks recently (when no repo occurred and money market rates surged), China (very quietly) announced CNY 1 trillion of 'Pledged Supplementary Lending' (PSL) by the PBOC to China Development Bank. This first use of the facility "smacks of quantitative easing" according to StanChart's Stephen Green, noting it is "deliberate and significant expansion of the PBOC's balance sheet via creating bank reserves/cash" and likens the exercise to the UK's Funding For Lending scheme. BofA is less convinced of the PBOC's quantitative loosening, suggesting it is more like a targeted line of credit (focused on lowering the costs of funding) and arguing with a record "asset" creation by Chinese banks in Q1 does China really need standalone QE?

 

China still has a liquidity crisis without the help of the PBOC… (when last week the PBOC did not inject liquidty via repo, money market rates spiked to six-month highs…)

 

 

And so the PBOC decided to unleash PSL (via BofA)

The China Business News (CBN, 18 June), suggests that the PBoC has been preparing a new monetary policy tool named “Pledged Supplementary Lending” (PSL) as a new facility to provide base money and to guide medium-term interest rates. Within the big picture of interest rate liberalization, the central banks may wish to have a series of policy instruments at hand, guaranteeing the smooth transition of the monetary policy making framework from quantity tools towards price tools.

 

PSL: a new tool for base money creation

 

Since end-1990s, China’s major source of base money expansion was through PBoC’s purchase of FX exchanges, but money created from FX inflows outpaced money demand of the economy. To sterilize excess inflows, the PBoC imposed quite high required reserve ratio (RRR) for banks at 17.5-20.0% currently, and issued its own bills to banks to lock up cash. With FX inflows most likely to slow after CNY/USD stopped its one-way appreciation and China’s current account surplus narrowed, there could be less need for sterilization. The PBoC may instead need to expand its monetary base with sources other than FX inflows, and PSL could become an important tool in this regard.

 

…and a tool for impacting medium-term policy rate

 

Moreover, we interpret the introduction of the PSL as echoing the remarks by PBoC Governor Zhou Xiaochuan in a Finance Forum this May that “the policy tool could be a short-term policy rate or a range of it, possibly plus a medium-term interest rate”. The PBoC is likely to gradually set short-term interbank rates as new benchmark rates while using a new policy scheme similar to the rate corridor operating frameworks currently used in dozens of other economies. A medium-term policy rate could be desirable for helping the transmission of short-term policy rate to longer tenors so that the PBoC could manage financing costs for the real economy.

 

Key features of PSL

 

Through PSL, the PBoC could provide liquidity with maturity of 3-month to a few years to commercial banks for credit expansion. In some way, it could be similar to relending, and it’s reported that the PBoC has recently provided relending to several policy and commercial banks to support credit to certain areas, such as public infrastructure, social housing, rural sector and smaller enterprises.

 

However, PSL could be designed more sophisticatedly and serve a much bigger monetary role compared to relending.

 

First, no collateral is required for relending so there is credit risk associated with it. By contrast, PSL most likely will require certain types of eligible collaterals from banks.

 

Second, the information disclosure for relending is quite discretionary, and the market may not know the timing, amount and interest rates of relending. If the PBoC wishes to use PSL to guide medium-term market rate, the PBoC perhaps need to set up proper mechanism to disclose PSL operations.

 

Third, relending nowadays is mostly used by the PBoC to support specific sectors or used as emergency funding facility to certain banks. PSL could be a standing liquidity facility, at least for a considerable period of time during China’s interest rate liberalization.

Some think China's PSL Is QE (via Market News International reports),

Standard Chartered economist Stephen Green says in a note that reports of the CNY1 trillion in Pledged Supplementary Lending (PSL) that the People's Bank of China recently conducted in the market smacks of quantitative easing. He notes that the funds which have been relent to China Development Bank are "deliberate and significant expansion of the PBOC's balance sheet via creating bank reserves/cash" and likens the exercise to the UK's Funding For Lending scheme. CDB's balance sheet reflects the transfer of funds, even if the PBOC's doesn't.

 

The CNY1 trillion reported — no details confirmed by the PBOC yet — will wind up in the broader economy and boost demand and "sends a signal that the PBOC is in the mood for quantitative loosening," Green writes

 

The impact will depend on whether the details are correct and if all the funds have been transferred already, or if it's just a jumped up credit facility that CDB will be allowed to tap in stages.

But BofA believes it is more likely a targeted rate cut tool (via BofA)

The investment community and media are assessing the possible form and consequence of the first case of Pledged Supplementary Lending (PSL) by PBoC to China Development Bank (CDB). The planned total amount of RMB1.0tn of PSL is more like a line of credit rather than a direct Quantitative Easing (QE). The new facility can be understood as a “targeted rate cut” rather than QE. We reckon that only some amount has been withdrawn by CDB so far. Despite its initial focus on shantytown redevelopment, we believe the lending could boost the overall liquidity and offer extra help to interbank market. Depending on its timespan of depletion, the actual impact on growth could be limited but sufficient to help deliver the growth target.

 

Relending/PSL to CDB yet to be confirmed

 

The reported debut of PSL was not a straightforward one. The initial news report by China Business News gave no clues on many of the details of the deal expect for the total amount and purpose of the lending. With the limited information, we believe the lending arrangement is most likely a credit line offered by PBoC to CDB. The total amount of RMB1.0tn was not likely being used already even for a strong June money and credit data. According to PBoC balance sheet, its claims to other financial institutions increased by RMB150bn in April and May. If the full amount has been withdrawn by CDB, it is equivalent to say PBoC conducted RMB850bn net injection via CDB in June, since CDB has to park the massive deposits in commercial banks. We assess the amount could be too big for the market as the interbank rates were still rising to the mid-year regulatory assessment. The PBoC could disclose the June balance after first week of August, we expect some increase of PBoC’s claims on banks, but would be much less than RMB850bn.

 

Difference with expected one

 

In our introductory PSL report, we argue that the operation has its root in policy reform of major central banks. However, we do not wish to compare literally with these existing instruments, namely ECB’s TLTRO or BoE’s FLS. Admittedly, the PBoC has its discretion to design the tailor-made currency arrangement due to the special nature of policy need. However, the opaque operation of PSL will eventually prove it a temporary arrangement and perhaps not serving as an example for other PSLs for its initial policy design to be achieved. According to Governor Zhou, the PSL is supposed to provide a reference to medium-term interest rate, which is missing in today’s case.

 

The focus is lowering cost of funding

 

We have been arguing that relending is a Chinese version of QE. Although relending is granted to certain banks, but there is no restriction on how banks use the funding. However, we believe PSL is more than that. The purpose of CDB’s PSL has been narrowed down to shantytown redevelopment, an area usually demands fiscal budget or subsidy in the past. Funding cost is the key to this arrangement.

 

Indeed, the PBoC has been working hard to reduce the cost of funding in the economy since massive easing is not an option under the increasing leverage of the economy. A currency-depreciation easing has been initiated by PBoC to bring down the interbank rate. Since then the central bank carefully manages the OMO in order to prevent liquidity squeeze from happening. On 24 July, State Council and CBRC have introduced workable measures to reduce funding cost of small and micro-enterprises.

 

Impact of the lending

 

PSL is not a direct QE, but there could be some side effect by this targeted lending. PSL to CDB means the funding demand and provision come hand-inhand. Targeted credit easing by nature is a requirement by targeted areas demanding policy support, which could be SMEs, infrastructure or social housing. In this regard, it is not surprising to see more PSL to support infrastructure financing. In addition to the direct impact on those targeted areas, we expect the overall funding cost could benefit from liquidity spillover.

 

Market reaction

 

Since the news about PSL with CDB last Monday, we have seen a rally in the Shanghai Composite Index. However we believe multiple factors may have contributed to the rebound in the stock market including: (1) better than expected macro data in 2Q/June and HSBC PMI surprising on the upside leading to improved sentiment; (2) The State Council and the CBRC have introduced measures to reduce funding cost of small and micro-enterprises; (3) More property easing with the removal of home purchase restrictions in several cities. PSL could have contributed to the improved sentiment on expectation of further easing.

Since as we noted previously, China's massive bank asset creation (dwarfing the US) hardly looks like it needs QE…

As Bank Assets exploded in Q1…

 

dramatically outpacing the US…

 

Unless something really bad is going on that needs an even bigger bucket of liquidity.

*  *  *

So whatever way you look at it, the PBOC thinks China needs more credit (through one channel or another) to keep the ponzi alive. Anyone still harboring any belief in reform, rotation to consumerism is sadly mistaken. One day of illiquidity appears to have been enough to prove that they need to keep the pipes wide open. The question is where that hot money flows as they clamp down (or not) on external funding channels.

Notably CNY has strengthened recently as the PSL appears to have encouraged flows back into China.

*  *  *

The plot thickened a little this evening as China news reports:

  • *CBRC ALLOWS CHINA DEV. BANK TO START HOUSING FINANCE BUSINESS
  • *CHINA APPROVES CDB'S HOME FINANCE DEPT TO START BUSINESS: NEWS

Thus it appears the PSL is a QE/funding channel directly aimed at supporting housing. CNY 1 trillion to start and maybe China is trying to create a "Fannie-Mae" for China.




via Zero Hedge http://ift.tt/1rVrWmM Tyler Durden

NYPD Cops Put Pregnant Woman in a Choke Hold Over Grilling In Front of Her House

bill de blasio's new yorkI am running out of ways to introduce this kind
of story. Were you a cop or a police apologist who thought
Eric Garner
should’ve just fucking complied with police if he
wanted to live? Did you think
Jahmiel Cuffee
should’ve known better after his first eight
marijuana arrests and done a better job hiding it from cops? Well,
this story involves a pregnant woman, who was put in a chokehold by
New York City cops, because she was grilling in front of her house.

Via the New York Post
:

A seven-months pregnant woman released photos on Monday that she
said show an NYPD cop putting her in a chokehold after officers
accused her and her family of illegally grilling on the
sidewalk.

The images, pulled from a cell phone video of the incident,
shows what appears to be an officer with his arm around the throat
of Rosan Miller, 27, as he tried to place her under arrest.

Chokeholds are banned by the NYPD and cops may consider the
maneuver used a “neck
restraint
.”

At a press conference earlier today New York City’s mayor,
Democrat Bill De Blasio, said that “the
law is the law
” and that the NYPD would continue to strictly
enforce petty laws like the ones that led to this pregnant woman’s
brutal encounter with police and Garner’s.  Bill Bratton, the
city’s police commissioner, added that respecting police and
correcting your behavior when they engage you is what democracy’s
all about.

By no means are the stories of alleged NYPD abuse highlighted
here at Reason a comprehensive account of all the police brutality
that happens in New York City—a lot of these stories never make the
news. I had a friend who claimed years ago local cops beat him up
but because of his criminal record didn’t feel comfortable
complaining.

I’ve had unpleasant encounters with police where I felt my
rights were violated but have been spared being their victim. My
parents, who grew up in Communist Poland, always taught me that
when interacting with police I should be be polite, avoid eye
contact, avoid volunteering information, and attempt to end the
interaction as quickly as possible. This was advice they
accumulated from decades of living under communist rule. Facing
assault, and even death, for failing to comply with authorities,
that’s what totalitarianism was about, not democracy.

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via IFTTT

Israel Destroys Hamas Media Broadcast Outlets In Massive Explosion – Live Feed

Operation Protective Edge entered its 22nd day on Tuesday, as Israeli ground forces continued their incursion into Gaza following the government rejection of a cease-fire draft proposed by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry over the weekend. Earlier in the evening, Haaretz reports the Israeli Air Force struck Hamas chief Ismail Haniyeh’s home in Gaza and then Reuters notes that Hamas said that its broadcast outlets, Al-Aqsa TV and Al-Aqsa Radio were also targeted. The television station continued to broadcast, but the radio station went silent.

 

 

The

 

 

Tonight in Gaza…

 

Live Feed

 

Operation Protective Edge by the numbers….

 

Source: Haaretz




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